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Factom Protocol Information

The Factom protocol is an open source general purpose data protocol built by an international group of technology companies that extends the security of blockchain to any type of data. Just as TCP / IP enables the WWW, the Factom Protocol enables countless applications to be built on top of it.
Factom is built from scratch and has novel design implementations that set it apart from all other blockchain protocols. We are confident these features will help propel Factom to become the internet's data integrity layer. You are invited to delve into our ecosystem and we look forward to answering any questions you have.
Token and Tokenomics
While the Factom Protocol is a two token system, only the Factoid (FCT) is transferable and able to be traded on exchanges. Entry Credits (EC) are obtained by burning FCT and are used to enter data into the Factom Protocol. Entry Credits are $.001 each and that price is fixed. Therefore, if FCT is worth $1.00 and you burn it, you receive 1,000 EC. If FCT is worth $10.00 each and you burn one, you receive 10,000 EC. This brilliant two token system allows for:
  1. The value of FCT to theoretically increase the more the Factom Protocol is utilized.
  2. Companies and governments can effectively budget for entering data onto the Protocol based upon their estimated usage.
  3. Subscription systems can be setup with 3rd parties where companies and governments don't have to hold cryptocurrency if they don't want to or can't for compliance reasons. FCT are still burned for EC by the 3rd party company but the subscriber is charged a small markup for the service.
Governance
Community Discussion
Development
Block Explorers
Tools
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Top Exchanges (by volume)
Education
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Authority Node Operators
Authority Node Operators are the coalition of companies that decentralize the Factom Protocol. .
Committees and Working Groups
As the Factom Protocol is one of the most decentralized blockchain projects in existence with no central authority, committees and working groups have been formed to deal with specific tasks.
Past Newsletters
submitted by DChapman77 to factom [link] [comments]

Beginner's guide to Myriad Mining 4: Raspberry Pi edition

Beginner's guide to Myriad Mining 4: Raspberry Pi edition!
 
Part 1 - Mining Myriad with your Desktop PC (CPU) is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6jj5z5/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_using_you
 
Part 2 - Mining Myriad with your NVIDIA GPU is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6jobfa/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_part_2_using/
 
Part 3 - Mining Myriad with your AMD GPU is here: https://www.reddit.com/myriadcoin/comments/6lsic9/beginners_guide_to_myriad_mining_part_3_using/
   
Requirements:
 
-A Raspberry Pi
-Keyboard, mouse, network cable
-A PC for the wallet
-SD card (8 GB+)
-Patience
 
I'm personally using a Pi 2, however I'd be interested to know if there are hurdles/hashrate differences with any of the other Pi models.
 
I also have a few Pi heatsinks on order, and it seems you may even be able to overclock your Pi for this - I'll have a look into this and report back if there is any interest in running the Pi mining, overclocked with a heatsink. Commonly these machines are used to control Bitcoin ASICs, so this should be interesting!
 
N.B. Some of the initial steps are similar (or even identical) to the earlier guides. I recommend reading through it from start to finish, even if you think you're far ahead of me - sometimes there's a simple error that can be corrected by making sure all the steps are done in order.
 
  1. Get your wallet: Click on one of the following links https://github.com/myriadteam/myriadcoin/releases/download/v0.11.3.2/myriad-0.11.3.2-win64-setup.exe (or https://github.com/myriadteam/myriadcoin/releases/download/v0.11.3.2/myriad-0.11.3.2-win32-setup.exe if your computer cannot run the first) to download the Myriad official wallet. Install it on your PC, follow the setup instructions, then click "receive". Enter a label and press "request payment". This will be your wallet address for your Pi. If you did this for the CPU, AMD, or NVIDIA mining guides, you can do it again - there's no harm in knowing exactly where the payments are coming from, and there's no limit to how many addresses you can make to request Myriad. I'm talking about "request payment" - you only need one wallet application!
  2. Sign up for an account on a mining pool that takes Myriadcoin - Yescrypt. "Yescrypt" is the code that allows your Pi to search for coins on the network, and should only work with a CPU (central processing unit). The one I've been using for my guides is https://miningpoolhub.com/ . Once you sign up, click "Myriadcoin - Yescrypt pool" on the left, then click on "workers". Add a new worker - I called my first one CPU1, CPU2 etc for each new CPU, then Pi1, Pi2 etc for each Raspberry Pi. Password doesn't matter. In the difficulty box, you can put "sd=0.01" for a Pi 2 - thanks smatdesa , however sometimes just leaving it to auto-adjust can work better.
  3. After this click "wallet" on the left. Enter your "payment address" from step 1 and your PIN, as well as "20" for automatic payout of coins you mine, so you see some coin in your wallet every day or two. Please note, some pools charge a fee for this. 0.1 is the fee for my pool, and I'm happy to pay it to have the coins safely with me, as I don't donate - I have far too few Myriad to do so.
  4. This is where the guide diverges from the previous guides. If you're following along at home, this is a good place to start if you're in a hurry to get mining.
  5. Download Raspbian from this link: https://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian_latest and click on "download ZIP under "Raspbian with desktop"(let me know if the link changes!). Whilst this is downloading, grab yourself a copy of 7-zip from www.7-zip.org ( http://www.7-zip.org/a/7z1604-x64.exe for 64-bit and http://www.7-zip.org/a/7z1604.exe for 32-bit ). If you don't know what "32-bit" or "64-bit" means, that's okay - generally, 64-bit should work fine.
  6. So, let's continue getting software ready. Install 7-zip by double-clicking on your downloaded file. Also grab yourself a copy of Etcher - for writing our Raspbian to our Pi SD card from this linK: https://etcher.io/ . Click "download for Windows x64". If this one doesn't work/install, click the little arrow to the right, and click "Etcher for Windows x64 (32-bit) (Installer).
  7. Now, with all of the required software in place to install Raspbian, let's write it to our SD card. Double click your Raspbian-Jessie .zip file, and drag the .img file inside into a foldeonto your desktop. After it extracts, open up your copy of Etcher, and click "select image" - pick the .img you just dropped. Select your SD card be careful here! make sure it's actually your SD card and click Flash.
  8. Start your Pi Once this is done, plonk your SD into your Pi, connect power, keyboard, mouse, and HDMI, and watch the pretty lights flashing! The next step is acquiring the mining software to get your Pi mining. On the desktop, which has a lovely picture of a road and some nature, if that's your thing. But we're here to get mining! Click on the fourth icon from the left (default) - Terminal - a little icon with a window and blue menu bar . You're presented with a CLI (command line interface) in lovely black and green.
 
Type the following into your CLI:
 
git clone https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
 
This should echo the following: "cloning into 'cpuminer-multi'...", and could potentially take a while - on my Pi 2 running Raspbian Jessie, it took me somewhere along the lines of half an hour for this step alone. You should end with "Checking out files: 100%" or something along these lines, and be returned to your blue $ CLI prompt. Next command is as follows:
 
sudo apt-get install automake autoconf pkg-config libcurl4-openssl-dev libjansson-dev libssl-dev libgmp-dev make g++
 
Hit "y" at the prompt to begin installation of the required packages.
 
The **next command happens to be the simple build command:
 
./build.sh
 
All done. Make yourself a cup of tea, and feel excited that your Pi is doing a thing (compiling). The next thing you know, it's all complete, and you're left staring at your lovely blue $ prompt. So let's get it working!
 
cd cpuminer-multi
 
This will get you into your folder. The following command should get you mining happily (yes!):
 
cpuminer -o stratum+tcp://hub.miningpoolhub.com:20577 -a yescrypt -u username.workername -p x -t 4
 
Explanation: We are using cpuminer to connect to the mining pool we joined in step 2. -a yescrypt is the algorithm we are using, username is the user name you joined the pool with, workername is the worker we added, all in step 2. -p is your password (it shouldn't matter - you could potentially put myriad2them00n, but let's not complicate things), and -t 4 is the number of threads - you can experiment with this, depending on your Pi - for my Pi 2, I get the most submitted shares with 4 threads.
 
Mining speed: To give you an idea of my experience: if you lined up 15 of these, all overclocked to 1 GHz, they would produce around the same hashrate as a modern i5 laptop (1.5 kH/s).
 
And that's it!. Shout out to smatdesa, who got me excited about working on this guide! Please post any new configurations, questions or comments below! Happy Myriad mining. And if your 3,166 Raspberry Pis are burning rubber and overflowing your coffers with XMY, or you just like what you see here, I'm humbly accepting: Donations (XMY only please):
 
MTeYZ6SQEKBCysTSf9LdW8rAxaahWSSvPd
submitted by MynaEradicator to myriadcoin [link] [comments]

What is the multisignature protocol - this explain why INX will be an anonymous coin as Monero!

What is the multisignature protocol - this explain why INX will be an anonymous coin as Monero!
What is the multisignature protocol - this explain why INX will be an anonymous coin as Monero!
https://preview.redd.it/gb8jjiva0yg11.jpg?width=800&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=bc0573826f48f45c3507d271f1fe85160592034f
Although Monero added the support for the multisignature protocol several months ago, there is still a certain lack of information online on how this technology works, so we would like to fill this gap first of all. Since the process of creating a multisignature transaction is rather complicated, we decided to focus only on its most vital aspects, including the processes of creating a wallet and exchanging keys, which we believe is enough to understand the strengths and weaknesses of this technology.
We tried to make the article more readable by ditching off most of the formulas and replacing them with schemes and illustrations, so we hope it will be useful not only to experienced engineers but to beginners as well.
On the Monero blockchain, the multisignature-related features is primarily used to allow for wallets, that have multiple users — which isn’t new, as pretty much the same solution was previously implemented by other digital currencies such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. In a nutshell, it allows for joint ownership of tokens which are being stored in a specific wallet. Joint ownership implies each participant has full rights to the entire amount, so there’s a reasonable limitation on its disposal: every transaction must be authorized by a certain share of participants, which is set out when the wallet is created.
The total number of owners and the approval threshold define the so-called “scheme” of a wallet. For instance, a 3/3 multisig wallet has three owners who have to unanimously approve every transaction, while in case of a 2/3 wallet each owner needs just another vote to transfer funds.
Cryptography
As is the case with most digital currencies, the Monero blockchain relies on elliptical-curve cryptography (learn more on Wikipedia). Simply put, this encryption system is valued for its relative cryptographic strength, smaller key size, and faster execution compared to many of its peers.
Every Monero wallet employs two sets of private and public cryptographic keys, each set being comprised of a “spend key” and a “view key”. Taken together, the public view key and the public spend key of a given wallet make up the address, which is used to receive funds. The same way, adding a private view key to a public spend key will create a tracking key, which your counterparts may use to track the funds being sent to your wallet (but never the other way around, so your privacy remains safe).
As you have probably guessed, the full access to a wallet is secured by a combination of its private spend and private view keys, so your private spend key must be kept in secret.
For the sake of brevity, from here on we will use uppercase letters for public keys (i.e. ‘B’ for ‘public spend key’), and lowercase letters for private keys (i.e. ‘b’ for ‘private spend key’). To help you understand the notation used below, let’s take a look at a short formula showing how a public key is derived from a private key:
https://preview.redd.it/7p0jh0dc0yg11.png?width=228&format=png&auto=webp&s=4d66dd129d33908cc6ac1653cc2133789a58f62a
where G is a fixed point on the elliptic curve. The multiplication of a private (scalar) key by G yields a public key, which is also a point on the same curve.Multisignature in Monero
The idea behind the multisig technology is pretty straightforward: having each participant to keep only a part of a wallet’s private spend key, so that transferring funds would require approval by a number of other participants.
It’s nearly impossible for any given participant to gain control over the entire private spend key, while all of them have their own unique public spend keys, as well as copies of both private and public view keys, allowing each participant to monitor the incoming funds.
Creating a multisig wallet in Monero
Currently, the Monero software supports only N/N and N-1/N schemes. To set up an N/N multisig wallet, the users need to complete a single round of calculations, with just one additional step required for the N-1/N scheme. The process of creating a 2/2 wallet is shown in Figure 1.
Figure 1. Creating a 2/2 multisig wallet
https://preview.redd.it/x930tzti0yg11.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=c20d9b6ceca1be28f41dd62931f6ad3bcfafc947
Firstly, the participants share all their private view and public spend keys, and then calculate their respective sums. The sum of the private view keys becomes the private view key for the new wallet, with its public view key being derived from the private one. Then, the public spent key is calculated the same way. If the N/N scheme was chosen, that’s all of it. The wallet is now created.
If users opt for the N-1/N scheme, they would still have to share their private view and public spend keys with each other, but then each participant must multiply all public spend keys received by their own private spend key. Thus, a new set of private spend keys is created, which is called “multisignature keys,” as shown in Figure 2.Figure 2. Creating a 2/3 multisig wallet
https://preview.redd.it/ay5ckzhk0yg11.png?width=470&format=png&auto=webp&s=2c5b7c973221a583fd00a9f5803c9f9775608c0f
📷
You might have noticed that in the figure above, the keys of the same color have the same value. This is because such multisignature keys have one important property expressed by the following equality:
https://preview.redd.it/dprohjoq0yg11.png?width=497&format=png&auto=webp&s=bf63932e61cefcfc581c5c4a177ba8e9e880c4f1
📷
To put it simply, when multiplying a private key by a public key, the indices can be moved as one would like without affecting the result (this is, by the way, the very property of such products that underlies the elliptic curve Diffie–Hellman key exchange protocol). This means that every multisig key is shared between exactly two participants.
To calculate a public spend key, which must be the same for all participants, each of them derives a public key from their respective multisignature key, and shares the result with others. Then the public spend key is calculated by summing the distinct values of all public multisig keys.
Now the participants only have to calculate a view key, which is done the same way as for a 2/2 wallet.
So, now that the wallet is created, let’s move on to looking at how it could be used.
Monero transactions
To explain how to launch a multisig transaction, let’s briefly consider how Monero deals with funds transfer in general. In a very simplified form (not taking into account ring signatures and RingCT), it works like this:
Figure 3. Simplified representation of a transaction
https://preview.redd.it/1pd1zu4s0yg11.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=02b97a4860389c20f311cb0f5ffd3f24ba594bc5
📷
On the right are the transaction outputs, or the money which the transaction generates, and on the left are the inputs, or the money being destroyed when said transaction is complete.
So, when Alice wants to send 1 XMR to Bob, she takes 1 XMR, plus the necessary commission, from her unspent outputs, puts it to her inputs, calculates a key image for each of them, and finally generates outputs for 1 XMR and an output key for each of them.
To complete the transaction, Bob uses his private view and public spend keys to restore the output keys for each output generated by Alice, and if there’s a match between the restored and the incoming keys, he will consider this output as intended for him.
From the network’s point of view, a multisig transaction isn’t in any sense different, although it’s a little bit more complicated to initiate. It’s usually done in several steps:
Participants exchange partial key images for all known outputs; Participants re-synchronize their wallets in order to learn its accurate balance taking into account the key images; The sender prepares the transaction, signs it, and sends it over to one of his counterparts; Each subsequent participant adds its own part of the RingCT signature; The last signer completes the creation of RingCT. 
Generating key images and sharing outputs
When scanning the blockchain (i.e. during the synchronization), a wallet is unable to determine whether some of the inputs are targeting its outputs, since it does not have the data to calculate key images for them, so it’s safe to say that it only accounts for incoming transactions.
In order to run a transaction correctly, a user needs to restore the key image for each of the outputs, then synchronize with the blockchain to determine which outputs have been spent, and then proceed to generating the transaction. In Figure 4, the process of restoring key images is shown as in case of a 2/3 wallet.Figure 4. Restoring key images as in case of a 2/3 wallet
📷
https://preview.redd.it/w6a5v08t0yg11.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=37570fc67117ab8de403d6aae0c11955e4aad915
Again, to put it simply, the key image for each output is calculated by summing the distinct values of all partial key images. As can be seen from the figure above, this can be done by any two participants out of three, and, most importantly, their private keys remain undisclosed during the transaction, making it impossible for a third party to restore the complete spend key and to seize control over their funds.
With this data, the initiating party can finalize the transaction, which is then sent to all confirmed participants to generate a Ring CT signature. Then, at the final stage, the transaction is signed and broadcast to the network.
Data exchange automation
The above are procedures for exchanging key parts and key images that need to be performed either once, or after each transaction is sent. In the current release of the Monero Core Wallet, these procedures are supposed to be performed manually by exchanging the necessary data on the secure communication channels (i.e. exporting the necessary data from the wallet and sending them via messengers or otherwise).
Here is an example of the procedures required to create a 2/3 wallet and sign a transaction. Each participant performs the following commands using the monero-wallet-cli utility:
MultisigV1baCWviNomMXe271W8HW4imh8SsnNEWP2bCswQfoB9MGzNZ8FUG3e8UCNm5toKQzSQH2e8rUWUCGazaCcvej1ToCQYBMovJZYaYiYWQvzsvyWruXycZdVDSsyugjEzwQNK3FUEkug2LXiH91NmekGb7kp9gK9kuoxDDhGn1nLKXUpnXR5
Send this multisig info to all other participants, then use make_multisig threshold info1 [info2…] with others’ multisig info.
This includes the PRIVATE view key, so needs to be disclosed only to that multisig wallet’s participants:
wallet 9uKCgo: make_multisig 2 MultisigV1XQugvU4JwcwTQbKdH5qGFnavxUX54wGxNis2iN6zoLD94DahnXbyNxH1NQBp2rYRFFJCT2uiJbssHLJYEAb8X1tS5UCqTXYu3FkgRNSZt5mRNgE58iXZHPj839Pbm3ozGcXmRT6GcRMMxMjRonfYKpnPq1UyZSMN7Qr9AYin1gYyoJSh MultisigV1HVqTW8P4UNWUE8QfBaEdwDWJuXBWEPnTrKqVJiUudGG14cHREk9TKmeR9xzSs4wf4jd22mV94C2ehSViApawnpp2SpRqp19eKXLHz2JmNp7eGR6TJMt4VsDTqANRwb1FtD9weef342f5KXDRZK7iQT1MTubyHhEcFyV5aLCjjQ8owMkH
Another step is needed
MultisigxV1PQwytRuYGkB6UEVJ7v2S7q492cwNTdwySXyasToAuQQq73TvM1rBrog5bcYz5w2P6Z4jwKtzrHr7shRGo5mAShvLVbYtBdQNhQsizMb51K7iaWQB4te5mQaiB1cok84CbvA9WKnVpTJGyb7SbS7NwAgmpEhU812RTdzrdHp5sD41duYtRNW6qna5mTMYmtTjAEdKpKCvM6EwhV4ncWscpvoBfyYP
Send this multisig info to all other participants, then use finalize_multisig info1 [info2…] with others’ multisig info:
wallet 9uKCgo: finalize_multisig MultisigxV1PdeMJo5rxcWTXDJ7rbyuacBseugsn2djZKKEdwvFYVmz73TvM1rBrog5bcYz5w2P6Z4jwKtzrHr7shRGo5mAShvLUxykuq5gho7gGQBCEa3JmBaY7rNHqqUaCUs1WWQi9tojZTMmCJJ4evwJzcXEDqcAd7ShwxsJtJtXdiATs54BbBfyCbwXbnDRKAtagJF36z74KJA58NgEmnHv23ZQeePCoacM MultisigxV1RTwyE53FjKPQaAn4ZMWM5hc8C92eJndpyKby4L9HpF2TUxykuq5gho7gGQBCEa3JmBaY7rNHqqUaCUs1WWQi9tojVbYtBdQNhQsizMb51K7iaWQB4te5mQaiB1cok84CbvA928U2yJFK86jNxtMopxHkcnYjjeYfp8TAB53Y1CukBiHfL2M4EztDALXLReXjJxkMry65Jw6vVePJp2T5CW8T8QE5
Before sending a transaction, all parties must exchange partial key images:
wallet 9uKCgo: export_multisig_info ki1
Multisig info exported to ki1.
wallet 9uKCgo: import_multisig_info ki2 ki3
Height 1103873, txid f7e648915287fafca1dc67eb26267e09f92bba7ab7fd52a12600c3e6440db0eb, 2.000000000000, idx 0/0
Height 1103882, txid 2e3a5591c741c0943a47a2bcbd1ec26493158088c88308bcbfc97423ea95c49, 0.009000000000, idx 0/0
Multisig info imported
Then the wallet is re-synchronized to account for the complete keys. After having received data on outgoing payments, one of the participants can set up the transaction:
wallet 9uKCgo: transfer 9vUnTucAioDHD4ZqrFHXAgfLqrsC3LkZ6JFr5axBLhDiFMaHuEk33aqXimoZEMtQh5ibdYxcNSBw2hBZLAsCnuw4B4rBeZX 1
No payment id is included with this transaction. Is this okay? (Y/Yes/N/No): Y
There is currently a 2 block backlog at that fee level. Is this okay? (Y/Yes/N/No)Y
Transaction 1/1:
Spending from address index 0
Sending 1.000000000000. The transaction fee is 0.012000000000
Is this okay? (Y/Yes/N/No): Y
Unsigned transaction(s) successfully written to file: multisig_monero_tx
Then the generated file is transferred to another participant to be signed and broadcast to the network:
[wallet 9twQxU]: sign_multisig multisig_monero_tx
Loaded 1 transactions, for 1.031762770000, fee 0.012000000000, sending 1.000000000000 to 9vUnTucAioDHD4ZqrFHXAgfLqrsC3LkZ6JFr5axBLhDiFMaHuEk33aqXimoZEMtQh5ibdYxcNSBw2hBZLAsCnuw4B4rBeZX, 0.019762770000 change to 9uKCgopHzXrQLnph1ZNFQgdxZZyGhKRLfaNv7EEgWc1f3LQPSZR7BP4ZZn4oH7kAbX3kCd4oDYHg6hE541rQTKtHB7ufnmk, with min ring size 7, no payment ID. Is this okay? (Y/Yes/N/No): Y
Transaction successfully signed to file multisig_monero_tx, txid 1d28af64bc78d05b625c4f7af7c321d4c8943c4c2692f57aa53e303387f40db6
[wallet 9twQxU]: submit_multisig multisig_monero_tx
Loaded 1 transactions, for 1.031762770000, fee 0.012000000000, sending 1.000000000000 to 9vUnTucAioDHD4ZqrFHXAgfLqrsC3LkZ6JFr5axBLhDiFMaHuEk33aqXimoZEMtQh5ibdYxcNSBw2hBZLAsCnuw4B4rBeZX, 0.019762770000 change to 9uKCgopHzXrQLnph1ZNFQgdxZZyGhKRLfaNv7EEgWc1f3LQPSZR7BP4ZZn4oH7kAbX3kCd4oDYHg6hE541rQTKtHB7ufnmk, with min ring size 7, no payment ID. Is this okay? (Y/Yes/N/No): Y
Transaction successfully submitted, transaction <1d28af64bc78d05b625c4f7af7c321d4c8943c4c2692f57aa53e303387f40db6>
You can check its status by using the show_transfers command.
Obviously, with a great desire to use multisig wallets, it’s possible, but this approach is unlikely to suit beginners or mobile users.
Therefore, we are developing our own solution that would allow us to automate the exchange of such data without violating the privacy of the parties and the security of transactions, making multisig applications on Monero accessible to more people. Our solution is being designed to support both standard and multisig wallets, and is being run on an open server that provides the exchange and transfer of data to corresponding wallets.
More information on our contribution to Monero can be found at https://exan.tech/en/projects/monero/, as well as at the project’s page at https://wallet.exan.tech.
Resume
Currently, only a limited set of signature schemes is supported, but the developers plan to extend the list to allow for arbitrary values such as 2/5, etc. The only supported way to exchange necessary data is rather inconvenient, but thanks to the Monero’s open ecosystem the community puts high hopes on third-party solutions being developed to improve the situation.
Later in this series, we will talk about other aspects of the Monero blockchain, such as RingCT and ring signatures, wallets architecture and the libwallet library, as well as the network’s future prospects.
Please ask your questions in the comment section, suggest topics for new cryptocurrency-related articles, and subscribe to our blog to stay abreast of our upcoming events and valuable publications.
From : https://hackernoon.com/monero-multisignatures-explained-46b247b098a7
#InziderX #Exchange #ico https://inziderx.io/
submitted by InziderX to u/InziderX [link] [comments]

Looking for suggestion for seedbox - I'm in US, the PT is mostly for Asia and would like large traffic

I have done some researches and it seems to me that seedhost.eu, Feral and Pulsed comes close to my budget range and need for disk space and traffic. However, I might be hesitant as I have read some negative reviews about Feral and Pulsed on this forum. Could someone give me some suggestions based on my following need? Thanks a lot!
Other important criteria might include, you might touch on, is for example:
submitted by N19htRange7 to seedboxes [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: PowerShell top posts from 2016-09-13 to 2017-09-12 15:08 PDT

Period: 363.81 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 13381
Rate (per day) 2.75 36.66
Unique Redditors 594 2754
Combined Score 34214 35206

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 1085 points, 28 submissions: Prateeksingh1590
    1. Powershell Cheat Sheet Compilation (177 points, 15 comments)
    2. Get-Weather report using Powershell (78 points, 20 comments)
    3. Plot Graph in Powershell console (68 points, 9 comments)
    4. Powershell : Find-UnsecureWifiConnection’s Nearby (57 points, 7 comments)
    5. Powershell Auto Mute, when headphones are accidently unplugged. (54 points, 5 comments)
    6. PowerShell : Get MP3/MP4 File’s MetaData and How to use it to make your Life easy (53 points, 2 comments)
    7. Scrolling Internet Explorer with Powershell (52 points, 2 comments)
    8. Get-Nutrient composition of Food Items using Powershell (47 points, 7 comments)
    9. Get-Summary of a Text document using PowerShell (43 points, 4 comments)
    10. PowerShell ranks 18 in RedMonk Programming Language Rankings (34 points, 11 comments)
  2. 777 points, 8 submissions: daviwil
    1. Just released v0.10.0 of the PowerShell extension for Visual Studio Code with an integrated console experience like the ISE! (166 points, 47 comments)
    2. Announcing PowerShell for Visual Studio Code 1.0! (124 points, 25 comments)
    3. Just released #PowerShell for VS @Code v0.12.0 with a bunch of fixes and improvements! (115 points, 48 comments)
    4. Just released PowerShell for VS Code v1.3.0 with CodeLens support for Pester tests and function references! (88 points, 8 comments)
    5. Just released v1.2.0 of PowerShell for VS Code with improvements for PSScriptAnalyzer and dynamic help snippets! (86 points, 29 comments)
    6. Just released PowerShell for Visual Studio Code 1.1.0 with a cool new feature: dynamic snippets for comment-based help! (77 points, 22 comments)
    7. Just released PowerShell for VS Code 1.4.0 with new code formatting presets and custom HTML content view APIs! (73 points, 17 comments)
    8. Check out new improvements to the integrated console and debugging experience in 0.11.0 of PowerShell for VS Code (48 points, 21 comments)
  3. 713 points, 18 submissions: markekraus
    1. Flat Is Justice! Flatter Code for PowerShell (77 points, 51 comments)
    2. Bye Bye Backtick: Natural Line Continuations in PowerShell (Get-PowerShellBlog markekraus) (73 points, 45 comments)
    3. PowerShell Fun for the Holidays! (73 points, 15 comments)
    4. PSRAW (PowerShell Reddit API Wrapper) 2.0 Released (51 points, 4 comments)
    5. Let’s Kill Write-Output (Get-PowerShellBlog markekraus) (49 points, 53 comments)
    6. TIFU By Breaking the PowerShell Core Nightly Build For the 2nd Time this Month (49 points, 14 comments)
    7. PowerShell GUI for Viewing/Exporting Dynamic Distribution List Members on Office 365 (41 points, 2 comments)
    8. If PowerShell Were School, I would Ditch Classes Regularly (39 points, 25 comments)
    9. Write The FAQ 'N Manual: Automated Documentation in a CI/CD Pipeline for PowerShell Modules with PlatyPS, psake, AppVeyor, GitHub and ReadTheDocs (markekraus Get-PowerShellBlog) (39 points, 13 comments)
    10. PSRAW: PowerShell Reddit API Wrapper Module - Core Functionality Release - v1.1.0.5 (36 points, 9 comments)
  4. 685 points, 13 submissions: rschiefer
    1. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - Storage (152 points, 13 comments)
    2. Slow Code: Top 5 Ways to Make Your PowerShell Scripts Run Faster (128 points, 25 comments)
    3. A Practical Guide for Using Regex in PowerShell (90 points, 10 comments)
    4. High Performance PowerShell with LINQ (56 points, 18 comments)
    5. Release v6.0.0-alpha.11 release of PowerShell (54 points, 11 comments)
    6. Hitchhikers Guide to the PowerShell Module Pipeline (41 points, 2 comments)
    7. How to create a Nano Server Image using PowerShell (34 points, 0 comments)
    8. Introducing Reverse DSC – Nik Charlebois (25 points, 4 comments)
    9. Nano Server with Kitchen.ci, Hyper-V AND Pester (24 points, 1 comment)
    10. PowerShell Magazine » ForEach and Where magic methods (22 points, 4 comments)
  5. 613 points, 3 submissions: nepronen
    1. Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer (503 points, 121 comments)
    2. Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer REPOST /PowerShell (81 points, 14 comments)
    3. Would you use a free simple WPF designer for PowerShell? (29 points, 11 comments)
  6. 600 points, 17 submissions: KevMar
    1. Everything you wanted to know about hashtables (73 points, 27 comments)
    2. Powershell: Everything you wanted to know about PSCustomObject (58 points, 25 comments)
    3. Kevmar: All .Net 4.6 Exceptions List for use with Powershell (57 points, 12 comments)
    4. KevMar on Powershell: The many ways to use regex (52 points, 19 comments)
    5. PowerShell + DevOps Global Summit 2017 - YouTube (41 points, 12 comments)
    6. KevMar: The many ways to read and write to files (39 points, 23 comments)
    7. KevMar: Let's build the CI/CD pipeline for a new module (37 points, 11 comments)
    8. KevMar: Building a Module, one microstep at a time (33 points, 18 comments)
    9. Kevmar: Remote install software (33 points, 11 comments)
    10. @ATXPowershell user group on Thur: General admin problems and how to solve them (29 points, 8 comments)
  7. 518 points, 11 submissions: l33t_d0nut
    1. Introducing PowerShell Pro Tools Universal Dashboard - Cross-platform, web-based dashboards (114 points, 29 comments)
    2. ConvertTo-PowerShell and ConvertTo-CSharp cmdlets now available in PowerShell Pro Tools module (85 points, 7 comments)
    3. PSPack.exe - Package PowerShell Script in an Executable (78 points, 22 comments)
    4. View as PowerShell - Chrome extension to convert C# to PowerShell (61 points, 3 comments)
    5. Converting C# to PowerShell using Roslyn (46 points, 13 comments)
    6. PowerShell Pro Tools for Visual Studio 2017 - Psst Form Designer (40 points, 3 comments)
    7. Converting PowerShell to C# through intent instead of an abstract syntax tree alone (26 points, 1 comment)
    8. Building WPF Windows with PowerShell in Visual Studio (19 points, 2 comments)
    9. Building Windows Forms with PowerShell in Visual Studio 2017 (18 points, 0 comments)
    10. PowerShell Tools for VS - May Release Notes (16 points, 3 comments)
  8. 483 points, 15 submissions: Net-Runner
    1. How To Create Progress Bars in PowerShell (118 points, 12 comments)
    2. Microsoft Transitioning Windows PowerShell 6.0 into PowerShell Core (47 points, 10 comments)
    3. How to Version and Publish a PowerShell Module to GitHub and PSGallery with AppVeyor (42 points, 0 comments)
    4. Managing Owners of Files and Folders with PowerShell (33 points, 4 comments)
    5. How to upload Custom Images to Microsoft Azure using PowerShell (29 points, 0 comments)
    6. Working with Arrays in PowerShell (28 points, 12 comments)
    7. Get Windows 10 digital license with Powershell (26 points, 7 comments)
    8. PowerShell Script to Load Balance DNS Server Search Order (25 points, 3 comments)
    9. PowerShell – where, .where or Where? (24 points, 6 comments)
    10. How To Grep in PowerShell (23 points, 43 comments)
  9. 473 points, 16 submissions: fourierswager
    1. In light of PowerShell Core, what's your plan for refactoring old stuff and writing new stuff? (57 points, 44 comments)
    2. WinRM-Environment Module - Make your remote PSSession environment the same as your local session. Plus the ability to edit files within the PowerShell console. (50 points, 7 comments)
    3. Start-SudoSession - Sudo for PowerShell written in 100% PowerShell! (42 points, 14 comments)
    4. Register-FileIOWatcher - function to montior one or more files and/or subdirectories for changes. (38 points, 5 comments)
    5. Get-UserSessionEx - Get all user session info in one place...for real though. (36 points, 5 comments)
    6. ManageLocalUsersAndGroups Module Significant Update: Now capable of managing local users and groups on Remote Hosts on different domains (or not on a domain at all) (36 points, 2 comments)
    7. Vi/Nano for PowerShell? (35 points, 30 comments)
    8. Start-PSLogging - Capture logs for ALL PowerShell activity on a system. (32 points, 7 comments)
    9. Replace-Text powerful, easy-to-use function. (24 points, 3 comments)
    10. EncryptDecrypt Module - Hybrid RSA/AES Encryption solution with PowerShell. Please use responsibly. (22 points, 1 comment)
  10. 439 points, 11 submissions: PowerShellChallenge
    1. Installing latest PowerShell Core 6.0 Release on Linux just got easier! (69 points, 14 comments)
    2. Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.1 now in Microsoft Update Catalog (60 points, 3 comments)
    3. PSSwagger – Automatically generate PowerShell cmdlets from OpenAPI (f.k.a Swagger) specification (56 points, 2 comments)
    4. PowerShell 6.0 Roadmap: CoreCLR, Backwards Compatibility, and More! (53 points, 9 comments)
    5. Join the PowerShell 10th Anniversary Celebration! (48 points, 2 comments)
    6. OpenSSH Security Testing Kick Off (47 points, 1 comment)
    7. PowerShell Open Source Community Dashboard (24 points, 1 comment)
    8. Managing Security Settings on Nano Server with DSC (23 points, 3 comments)
    9. Windows PowerShell 2.0 Deprecation (21 points, 4 comments)
    10. Code Coverage – Part 2 (19 points, 0 comments)
  11. 417 points, 6 submissions: thebeersgoodnbelgium
    1. dbatools - an open source project, now with over 100 PowerShell commands for DBAs. Here's our most recent release! • /SQLServer (123 points, 1 comment)
    2. I'm presenting tomorrow! PowerShell ❤ SQL Server: Modern Database Administration with dbatools & dbareports (83 points, 12 comments)
    3. Official SqlServer module now in the PowerShell Gallery! (83 points, 16 comments)
    4. If all goes well, the SQL Server module will be in the PowerShell Gallery in the next month! (80 points, 25 comments)
    5. we just added 63 commands to a beta dbatools release - help us test, please? :D (27 points, 8 comments)
    6. Rejoice! dbatools now helps with SPN management: Get-DbaSpn, Set-DbaSpn, Test-DbaSpn & Remove-DbaSpn • /SQLServer (21 points, 0 comments)
  12. 414 points, 13 submissions: ramblingcookiemonste
    1. What have you done with PowerShell this month? July 2017 (53 points, 83 comments)
    2. What have you done with PowerShell this month? March 2017 (51 points, 69 comments)
    3. What have you done with PowerShell this month? June 2017 (41 points, 84 comments)
    4. What have you done with PowerShell this month? April 2017 (40 points, 46 comments)
    5. What have you done with PowerShell this month? January 2017 (33 points, 54 comments)
    6. What have you done with PowerShell this month? November 2016 (33 points, 51 comments)
    7. 2016 Retrospection: What have you done with PowerShell this year? (31 points, 25 comments)
    8. What have you done with PowerShell this month? October 2016 (27 points, 68 comments)
    9. What have you done with PowerShell this month? August 2017 (25 points, 45 comments)
    10. What have you done with PowerShell this month? September 2016 (24 points, 40 comments)
  13. 408 points, 8 submissions: oze4
    1. Install a Powershell Script .ps1 as a Windows Service! GUI that allows you to install and run a Powershell script as a Windows Service! (With example .ps1 you can run as a service) (129 points, 50 comments)
    2. Run PowerShell Script (.ps1) as a Windows Service! (88 points, 49 comments)
    3. GUI Tool For Enabling/Disabling AD Accounts & Reset PWs! (59 points, 40 comments)
    4. Custom "Windows Explorer" for Powershell GUI scripts (51 points, 3 comments)
    5. Is there a way to tell when windows is at the login screen after boot via power shell? (23 points, 11 comments)
    6. How to install a PowerShell script as a Windows Service. GUI Edition! ~PaaWS: PowerShell as a Windows Service~ with bonus uninstaller (20 points, 6 comments)
    7. Get permissions for specific Active Directory user - even if they are in a Group! (19 points, 0 comments)
    8. Log your pings! (19 points, 18 comments)
  14. 402 points, 9 submissions: happysysadm
    1. A PowerShell function to rapidly gather system events for sysadmin eyes only with some tips (92 points, 24 comments)
    2. Is WinRM Secure or do I need HTTPs? (63 points, 7 comments)
    3. Getting weather data with PowerShell and other funny things you can do in just a line of code (59 points, 0 comments)
    4. Ramp up your PowerShell knowledge in 2017 with these books (52 points, 8 comments)
    5. Announcing the winner of the PowerShell Oneliner Contest 2016 (43 points, 10 comments)
    6. The new way to check computer information with PowerShell and WMF 5.1 (30 points, 15 comments)
    7. Do you think you know PowerShell? Code Golf - Find Next Palindrome Number (26 points, 6 comments)
    8. Using the PoshRSJob module with a PowerShell function to perform a WinRM check up (20 points, 0 comments)
    9. All the 7 principles of the LEAN methodology in a single line of PowerShell code (17 points, 21 comments)
  15. 367 points, 4 submissions: mikefrobbins
    1. How to install Visual Studio Code and configure it as a replacement for the PowerShell ISE (144 points, 44 comments)
    2. Announcing a new book: PowerShell 101 – The No-Nonsense Beginner’s Guide to PowerShell (106 points, 3 comments)
    3. Use PowerShell to Determine if Specific Windows Updates are Installed on Remote Servers (78 points, 18 comments)
    4. PowerShell One-Liner to Disable Active Directory Accounts and Log the Results to a SQL Server Database (39 points, 6 comments)
  16. 331 points, 7 submissions: signalwarrant
    1. PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) How-To for Beginners (Pull Mode) (87 points, 7 comments)
    2. Hey PowerShell... Text me when the Domain Admins Group changes. (75 points, 13 comments)
    3. Fellow PowerShell wizards... You need version control in your life. (43 points, 11 comments)
    4. Create an HTML report of Active Directory Forest Information with PowerShell (42 points, 4 comments)
    5. PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) How-To for Beginners (Push Model) (39 points, 3 comments)
    6. Automate Creating Lab Virtual Machines in Azure with PowerShell (26 points, 3 comments)
    7. Convert text files to PDF then merge PDFs in bulk with PowerShell and iTextSharp (19 points, 6 comments)
  17. 324 points, 6 submissions: ColeMcDonald
    1. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: 4 - Loops (87 points, 11 comments)
    2. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - Part 3: Input (63 points, 2 comments)
    3. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: Data - Classes and Storage (63 points, 4 comments)
    4. Here's the second step on our journey to world domination through scripting. (40 points, 12 comments)
    5. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - 5 - Decisions (40 points, 6 comments)
    6. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps: Data - 3.Movement... This week, classes and methods move around in another dimension... or something like that. (31 points, 0 comments)
  18. 265 points, 6 submissions: jerdub1993
    1. PowerShell for beginners video training course as taught by its inventor, Jeffery Snover. (145 points, 8 comments)
    2. Change all AD usernames to firstname.lastname and rename home directory. (34 points, 13 comments)
    3. Query IMDB for movies and information. (32 points, 10 comments)
    4. Is it possible to use PowerShell to get information from an online account if you provide the credentials? (ie: Facebook, email, Reddit inbox?) (24 points, 12 comments)
    5. Help piping multiple values by property name? (15 points, 14 comments)
    6. Is it possible to test a command without running it? (15 points, 11 comments)
  19. 259 points, 3 submissions: nickrod518
    1. Never too busy to have fun... send cat facts to coworker's PC's using PowerShell (183 points, 20 comments)
    2. Migrate Windows user profile(s) from one computer to another or to an archive (57 points, 20 comments)
    3. Create a price chart of Bitcoin from the last 30 days (19 points, 7 comments)
  20. 242 points, 2 submissions: blownart
    1. 10 Free PowerShell e-books (187 points, 16 comments)
    2. PowerShell 10 Year Anniversary (55 points, 9 comments)
  21. 230 points, 1 submission: bigbirdtoejam
    1. Using powershell for office pranks (230 points, 86 comments)
  22. 215 points, 5 submissions: kabanossi
    1. Learn basics of PowerShell & PowerCLI under 1.5 hours (76 points, 2 comments)
    2. The Top 3 Features in Visual Studio Code for PowerShell Folks (74 points, 20 comments)
    3. Powershell Script to Get ESXi Datastore Path Information (27 points, 4 comments)
    4. vCenter Cluster Performance Tool (21 points, 0 comments)
    5. Making sure your Citrix Desktops are utilized in 35 lines of PoSH (17 points, 0 comments)
  23. 214 points, 1 submission: pmd006
    1. Not what I expected (214 points, 33 comments)
  24. 213 points, 6 submissions: 1RedOne
    1. Extracting and monitoring web content with PowerShell (45 points, 19 comments)
    2. POWERSHELL DECONSTRUCTED - A deep dive into how binary modules work (44 points, 20 comments)
    3. SOLVED: What happens to WINRM when certs die (37 points, 19 comments)
    4. Adding tab-completion to your PowerShell Functions (36 points, 15 comments)
    5. Advanced Autocompletion - Part II (30 points, 16 comments)
    6. Building a DSC Design application with PowerShell (21 points, 8 comments)
  25. 183 points, 4 submissions: AdminArsenal
    1. Happy Star Wars Day, /PowerShell (77 points, 2 comments)
    2. Creating a Hipster Playlist Using PowerShell (42 points, 4 comments)
    3. Anyone looking for a full-time PowerShell position? (39 points, 55 comments)
    4. Determining Disk Type with Get-PhysicalDisk (25 points, 3 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. markekraus (1517 points, 465 comments)
  2. Lee_Dailey (1044 points, 590 comments)
  3. KevMar (899 points, 297 comments)
  4. ihaxr (404 points, 84 comments)
  5. daviwil (287 points, 75 comments)
  6. spyingwind (285 points, 94 comments)
  7. Sheppard_Ra (277 points, 103 comments)
  8. ka-splam (265 points, 85 comments)
  9. JBear_Alpha (255 points, 102 comments)
  10. jheinikel (254 points, 62 comments)
  11. SeeminglyScience (230 points, 74 comments)
  12. SaladProblems (222 points, 92 comments)
  13. Swarfega (207 points, 64 comments)
  14. OathOfFeanor (198 points, 71 comments)
  15. Snak3d0c (191 points, 110 comments)
  16. root-node (188 points, 66 comments)
  17. evetsleep (188 points, 59 comments)
  18. gangstanthony (188 points, 55 comments)
  19. ramblingcookiemonste (165 points, 29 comments)
  20. fourierswager (161 points, 75 comments)
  21. creamersrealm (158 points, 70 comments)
  22. itmonkey78 (154 points, 38 comments)
  23. artvandelay440 (151 points, 62 comments)
  24. 1RedOne (150 points, 60 comments)
  25. nepronen (148 points, 39 comments)
  26. the_spad (148 points, 33 comments)
  27. Ominusx (139 points, 38 comments)
  28. omers (139 points, 38 comments)
  29. oze4 (135 points, 74 comments)
  30. Old-Lost (132 points, 41 comments)
  31. halbaradkenafin (127 points, 38 comments)
  32. alinroc (127 points, 19 comments)
  33. cml0401 (126 points, 41 comments)
  34. icklicksick (125 points, 45 comments)
  35. KnifeyGavin (124 points, 42 comments)
  36. michaeltlombardi (120 points, 63 comments)
  37. aXenoWhat (119 points, 48 comments)
  38. toregroneng (117 points, 36 comments)
  39. pertymoose (112 points, 35 comments)
  40. _Unas_ (109 points, 39 comments)
  41. suddenarborealstop (107 points, 40 comments)
  42. allywilson (103 points, 41 comments)
  43. Flyboy (98 points, 13 comments)
  44. cofonseca (97 points, 39 comments)
  45. lordv0ldemort (94 points, 35 comments)
  46. NathanielArnoldR2 (87 points, 31 comments)
  47. chreestopher2 (85 points, 38 comments)
  48. steviecoaster (85 points, 34 comments)
  49. yeah_i_got_skills (85 points, 19 comments)
  50. Emiroda (84 points, 30 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer by nepronen (503 points, 121 comments)
  2. Using powershell for office pranks by bigbirdtoejam (230 points, 86 comments)
  3. Not what I expected by pmd006 (214 points, 33 comments)
  4. 10 Free PowerShell e-books by blownart (187 points, 16 comments)
  5. Announcing the PowerShell Module Browser by tr4p (183 points, 30 comments)
  6. Never too busy to have fun... send cat facts to coworker's PC's using PowerShell by nickrod518 (183 points, 20 comments)
  7. Powershell Cheat Sheet Compilation by Prateeksingh1590 (177 points, 15 comments)
  8. Just released v0.10.0 of the PowerShell extension for Visual Studio Code with an integrated console experience like the ISE! by daviwil (166 points, 47 comments)
  9. Learn Powershell in 5 Painless Steps - Storage by rschiefer (152 points, 13 comments)
  10. Would anyone here like to see content related to Active Directory? by deleted (150 points, 28 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 78 points: screamingpackets's comment in Are there any free alternatives to using Powershell ISE?
  2. 53 points: GenghisChaim's comment in Windows 10 Hardening Via Powershell
  3. 49 points: Alliwantispcb's comment in Using powershell for office pranks
  4. 47 points: scabby_al's comment in Vote to petition native PowerShell support in Microsoft Excel - PowerShell Macros!
  5. 46 points: dbussanich's comment in Does anyone have a job where they only write powershell scripts?
  6. 42 points: nepronen's comment in Free Online PowerShell GUI Designer
  7. 40 points: deleted's comment in PowerShell for private purposes?
  8. 38 points: bukem's comment in $MyInvocation annoys me. What is a foolproof, reliable way to get path of currently run script?
  9. 36 points: Quicknoob's comment in Top 10 powershell scripts you use
  10. 36 points: gdhhorn's comment in Is it possible to test a command without running it?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Cisco IOS CLI for beginners - Part 2 - YouTube bitcoin-cli and bitcoind - Breaking Down Bitcoin Ep. 2 How To Trade Bitcoin Cryptocurrency for Beginners - YouTube Monero CLI is easy Quick Configs Ubiquiti - Learn the Command Line (CLI) Part ...

A complete beginners guide to installing a Bitcoin Full Node on Linux (2018 Edition) ... Skim this section for the commands if you’re already on Linux. I’ll even condense them all at the bottom of this article for those who don’t need the explanations. The first thing we’re going to do in the terminal is check for updates. Type the following and hit enter (along the way you’ll be ... Make sure that you are using user “bitcoin” for the following commands. $ bitcoin-cli getwalletinfo $ bitcoin-cli walletpassphrase JkUX.....xcXe 600 $ eclair-cli getinfo $ eclair-cli connect ... To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli: error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."} After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with ... To know how to encrypt check out this core wallet beginners guide. Also if you do not know then here is a guide to backup and restore core wallet. Bitcoin core console window. In the older version of Bitcoin client you should see the debug window under Help > Debug window where you can start entering bitcoin-cli commands. In the latest version drop down windows menu and open up console window ... For working bitcoind command in windows, you have to go to dir C:\Program Files\Bitcoin\daemon and Execute these commands. Using Bitcoin core version 16 on windows 10. bitcoind getinfo in Linux. bitcoind -h in windows. Use this command after changing directory like shown in pic. share improve this answer follow edited Mar 13 '18 at 5:59. answered Mar 13 '18 at 5:52. Vishal Dalve Vishal ...

[index] [15825] [28928] [18586] [11634] [20361] [37215] [4856] [50406] [28517] [31546]

Cisco IOS CLI for beginners - Part 2 - YouTube

OneDrive link to all Ubiquiti Video config files: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AsuDsQ7TSDqNgU3bHKtUeUIhAX1M This video is aimed at working with the command line inter... Configure console and VTY interfaces, for telnet access, as well as a Fast Ethernet interface. Cisco CCNA IOS CLI http://danscourses.com We cover chapter 3 of Andreas Antonopoulos' book Mastering Bitcoin. Featured are examples of bitcoin-cli commands, and simple Python scripts to interact with the bitcoin blockchain. Referenced links: *****UPDATE***** Solo mining has been removed from client. I'll keep the video up for how it used to work, it might still work for some alt coins (unsure) yo... Get an additional $10 in Bitcoins from Coinbase when purchasing through my referral link http://fredyen.com/get/Bitcoins Here is a quick beginner's guide on ...

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