10 Reasons Why Bitcoin Will Pass $15,000 In 2020 by ...

[Reference] Here's a raw list of ~300 retailers that accept BCH via Gyft & eGifter. It's fun to spendl both online & in your neighborhood!

Confused? Scroll to bottom.
Gyft.com:
1-800-Baskets.com 1-800-Flowers.com 1-800-PetSupplies.com Adidas Aerie Aeropostale Allposters.com AMC Theatres American Airlines American Eagle American Frame App Store & iTunes Applebee's Aquarium Restaurants Art.com Athleta Babin's Seafood House Bahama Breeze Banana Republic Barnes & Noble Bass Pro Shops Bath & Body Works Bed Bath & Beyond® Belk Best Buy® Big Fish Seafood Bistro Bloomingdale's Boomerang Grille Brenner's Steakhouse Brinker Restaurants Brookstone Bubba Gump Shrimp Buca di Beppo Buffalo Wild Wings Build-A-Bear Workshop Burger King Burlington buybuy BABY® Cabela's Cadillac Bar California Pizza Kitchen Callaway CanvasPop Captain D's Caribou Coffee Casual Male XL Catherines CB2 Champs Sports CharityChoice Charleston's Restaurant Charley's Crab Chart House Chef'd Cheryl's Cookies Chili's Chipotle Christmas Tree Shops® andThat! Claim Jumper Cold Stone Creamery Columbia Sportswear Cost Plus World Market Crate & Barrel Crutchfield D'Angelo Darden Restaurants Dell Delta Air Lines Destination XL Domino's Dunkin' Donuts eBay EXPRESS Fandango Fish Tales Fisherman's Wharf Foot Locker FragranceNet.com Fruit Bouquet GameStop Gap Factory Gap Gilt.com Go Play Golf by Fairway Rewards Golden Nugget Google Play Great American Days Grotto Groupon Hal Smith Restaurant Hallmark Harlow's Food & Fun Hefner Grill Hollie's Flatiron Steakhouse Hollister HomeGoods Hot Topic Hotels.com Hulu IHOP JCPenney Jo-Ann Stores Kemah Boardwalk Kmart Kohl's L.L.Bean La Griglia Lady Foot Locker Landry's Landry's Seafood Lands' End Lane Bryant Legal Sea Foods Levy Restaurants Lighthouse Buffet Lobster Gram Logan's Roadhouse LongHorn Steakhouse Lord and Taylor Louie's Grill & Bar Lowe's Lucille's BBQ Macy's Magazines.com Maggiano's Little Italy Mahogany Steakhouse Mama Roja Kitchen Marshalls McCormick & Schmicks Microsoft Office 365 Home, 1-year subscription Microsoft Office 365 Personal, 1-year subscription Mitchell's Fish Market Morton's Muer Seafood NASCAR.com NFLShop.com Nike Nintendo Nordstrom Nordstrom Rack Old Navy Olive Garden Omaha Steaks On The Border One Kings Lane Overstock.com Panera Bread Papa Gino's Papa John's Pizza Peohe's Petco Pro Am Golf Rainforest Cafe Red Lobster Red Robin Red Sushi Redrock Canyon Grill Regal Cinemas River Crab/BlueWater Inn Rixty Rochester Big & Tall Romano's Macaroni Grill Rosetta Stone TOTALe Royal Caribbean Saks OFF 5TH Saltgrass Steak House San Jose Earthquakes San Luis Resort Sears Sephora Sheetz Shutterfly Simms Steakhouse SiriusXM Southwest Airlines Spa & Wellness by Spa Week SpaFinder Staples Starbucks Steak 'n Shake Stein Mart Steiner Sports Memorabilia StubHub T-Rex T.J.Maxx Target GiftCard TGI Fridays The Cheesecake Factory The Children's Place The Crab House The Flying Dutchman The Garage The Home Depot® The Oceanaire The Popcorn Factory The Red Door Salon & Spa ThinkGeek Toby Keith's Bar & Grill Tony Roma's Torrid Tower of America Uber - INCLUDING Uber Eats (food delivery from your local takeout restaurants!) Ulta Beauty Under Armour® Unleashed by Petco Uno Chicago Grill Upper Crust Pizza Vic and Anthony's Victoria's Secret Walmart Whole Foods Market Willie G's Wine Country Gift Basket Wine Enthusiast Wine.com Xbox LIVE Yak & Yeti Yard House Zappos.com 
eGifter.com
1-800-Flowers.com Abercrombie & Fitch Acorns Adidas Aerie Aeropostale Alamo Drafthouse AllPosters.com Amazon.com AMC Theaters Amella Caramels American Airlines American Eagle Outfitters American Frame Applebee's Aquarium Restaurants Athleta Babin's Seafood House babyGap Bahama Breeze Banana Republic Bar Toma Barnes & Noble Booksellers Bass Pro Shops Bath & Body Works Bed Bath & Beyond Belk Best Buy® Big Fish Restaurant BJs Restaurants Black Angus Steakhouse Bloomin' Brands Bloomingdale's Bonefish Grill Boscov's Boston Market Boxed Brenner's Steakhouse Bridge Bar Brookstone Bubba Gump Buffalo Wild Wings Build-A-Bear Burger King Burlington Coat Factory buybuy Baby Cabela's Cadillac Bar Cafe Spiaggia California Pizza Kitchen Callaway CanvasPop Captain D's Captain Morgan Club Caribou Coffee Carnival Cruise Lines Carrabbas Italian Grill Casual Male Celebrity Cruises Champs Sports Charity Choice Charleston's Restaurant Charley's Crab Chart House Restaurant Chef'D Children's Music Shop Chili's Chipotle Christmas Tree Shops Cirque du Soleil Claim Jumper Cold Stone Creamery Columbia Sportswear CrossFire Crutchfield CVS/pharmacy D'Angelo Darden Dell Delta Airlines Destination Maternity Destination XL Domino's Pizza Downtown Aquarium Dunkin' Donuts Ebay Express Facebook Game Card Fandango Fish Tales Fisherman's Wharf Fleming's Prime Steakhouse & Wine Bar Foot Locker FragranceNet.com Fulton’s Crab House Fulton’s on the River GameStop Gap Gap Options GCodes® AT&T Prepaid Plans GCodes® Verizon Prepaid Plans Gilt Go Play Golf GoCash GolfThere Googie Burger Great American Days Grotto Groupon Guitar Center Gymboree Hal Smith Restaurant Group Harlow's Hefner Grill Hollie’s Flatiron Steakhouse Hollister HomeGoods HOOCHs Hot Topic Hotels.com Hulu IHOP IMVU IndieFlix iTunes JAGEX Jake Melnick's Corner Tap JCPenney Jiffy Lube Jo-Ann Fabric JumpStart School of Dragons Karma Koin Kemah Boardwalk Kingsisle Pirate Kingsisle Wizard Kmart Kohl's Krispy Kreme La Griglia Landry's Landry's Seafood Lands' End Lane Bryant Legal Sea Foods Lobster Gram Logan's Roadhouse Longhorn Steakhouse Lord & Taylor Louie's Grill & Bar Lowe's Lucille's Smokehouse BBQ Macy's Magazines.com Maggiano's Little Italy Mahogany Prime Steakhouse Mama Roja Mexican Kitchen Marshalls McCormick & Schmick's Microsoft Office 365 Home Microsoft Office 365 Personal MobileLocate Morton's The Steakhouse Muer Seafood Restaurants NASCAR.com Superstore Neopets NetDragon Universal Nike Nintendo eShop Digital Cards Nordstrom Nordstrom Rack O'Charley's Oak Street Beach Food + Drink Old Navy Olive Garden Omaha Steaks On the Border Mexican Grill & Cantina Outback Steakhouse Overstock.com P.C. Richard and Son Panera Bread Papa Gino's Pizzeria Papa John's Peohe's Petco PetSupplies.com Portobello Princess Cruises ProAm Golf Rainforest Cafe ReallyColor Red Lobster Red Robin Red Sushi Redrock Canyon Grill Regal Entertainment Group REI Rixty ROBLOX Rochester Big & Tall Ruby Tuesday Saks OFF 5th Saltgrass Sears Sephora Sheetz Shutterfly Simms Steakhouse Simply Magazine Sirius XM Skype Sling TV Sony Playstation Southwest Airlines Spa and Wellness by Spa Week Spa Finder Spiaggia Stage Stores Staples Steak 'n Shake Stein Mart Steiner Sports Memorabilia Stitch Fix Stockpile StubHub Studio Movie Grill Swap.com T-Rex T.J.Maxx Target Texas Roadhouse TGI Fridays The Cheesecake Factory The Children's Place The Crab House The Flying Dutchman The Garage The Home Depot The Oceanaire ThinkGeek Toby Keith's I Love This Bar & Grill Tony Roma's Torrid Tower of the Americas Tracer Pix Uber - INCLUDING Uber Eats (food delivery from your local takeout restaurants!) Ulta Unlimited eBooks Uno Upper Crust Wood Fired Pizza Vic & Anthony's Vimbly Walmart Wargaming World of Tanks Wargaming World of Warships Whole Foods Willie G's Wine Country Gift Baskets Wine Enthusiast Wine.com Wolfgang Puck Grand Cafe WWE Network XBOX Xbox Live Gold Yak and Yeti Yard House 
For those who don't know, Gyft.com & eGifter.com sell gift cards online (Amazon, iTunes, BedBathBeyond, etc., like you see in the revolving rack at the corner convenience store). Both services accept BitcoinCash (via Bitpay). Instead of a plastic card, they send you a "virtual" card (an activation code). So you can buy stuff from all the stores above with BCH (& then replace your BCH so you don't later feel like you spent $500 on diapers :)
I scraped and massaged the lists from both services for you because I find it easier to refer to than browsing their sites that make you scroll through logos instead.
Many of the retailers are found on both services. Many are unique to one. The superset is probably about 300 (plus thousands of local restaurants that participate with Uber Eats).
There's a lot more than Restaurants, Starbucks & Playstore! You'll find Uber, airlines (Southwest, American, Delta), Hotels.com, XBOX, Playstation, Dell, Microsoft Office, Hulu, Ebay, Wine.com, Walmart, Target, Home Depot, CVS Pharmacy, Marshalls, Panera, Nordstrom Rack, Nike, Adidas, Zappo, Foot Locker... You can literally live on BCH now (if only there were a way to pay utilities and rent/mortgage).
You can have a super smooth experience buying a card while queuing for the register. When you tap to pay in BitcoinCash (or BTC) from the Gyft app, android prompts you to launch your wallet! The amount, fee, and receiving address is already filled in. Simply take a look to confirm and then slide to pay. In seconds (before the next register is open) the new gift card is in your Gyft app "wallet" and ready to be scanned by the cashier. You can also regift/send the gift card to a friend instead of activating/revealing the card's code.
Note that Uber credit is how you pay for Uber Eats, so an Uber gift card can not only get you around town but also bring food to your door from restaurants in your neighborhood.
Feel free to paste the lists into the weekly/monthly or any BCH updates, or to categorize it (i should have but I don't know them all). It's not my data obviously. I don't know how often the two services update the lists.
(Not sure which are limited to regions. I can confirm that Uber gift card was credited when pasted in the Uber app, in Japan, but wasn't usable for rides in Japan. The balance was perfectly usable later, in USA.)
submitted by LuxuriousThrowAway to btc [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Investors

Hello! My name is Mihail Kudryashev, I am a frontend engineer at Platinum. We are a an international STO/IEO/ICO/POST ICO consulting, promotion and fundraising company with huge experience in STO and ICO marketing and best STO blockchain platform in the world! Learn more about it: Platinum.fund Our company gained popularity after launching the world’s number one online university with only practical knowledge on crypto economics. Now you can learn how to create and develop your own ICO and STO, how to market your campaign and make it super successful. Who are cryptocurrency investors? What drives people to invest in cryptocurrency? Read the extract of the UBAI lesson to get all the answers.
Introduction to the Investors §2
In 2017, the total cryptocurrency market capitalization was approaching $850B which begs the question:
Why are investors turning to cryptocurrencies?
A survey by Blockchain Capital indicated that at least 30% of millennials would rather invest in bitcoin than invest in traditional stocks. Cryptocurrency investors, like traditional investors, expect a return at least proportionate to the risk they take. Due to the fundamental lack of regulation, incredible volatility and astronomical relative risk, many cryptocurrency investors expect to earn meteoric returns. Returns in the ranges of multiples from 200% to 1000%.
Let us first begin by examining the kinds of people who invest in cryptocurrency, and then let’s see the reasons why each of them is investing in this relatively new market.
Types of Investors
The “Newbie” Cryptocurrency Investor
This investor is just starting out. They probably have not had any significant experience in any form of investing before and bitcoin is their first experience. They have heard about people making incredible returns from cryptocurrency investing, or some aspect of the entire blockchain and crypto revolution attracts them, and they decide they want to invest too.
Unfortunately, most of the newbie investors will end up losing their money, primarily because of one specific misconception; they think cryptocurrency investing is an easy way to make huge profits. “ “Types of Investors §2
“Gambler” or “Get Rich Quick” Investor
This is the second class of cryptocurrency investor, and is actually not really an investor at all.
This type of person is out to make a fortune as fast as possible. They will fall for whatever sweet-sounding scheme they hear. They love ideas that promise to double or triple their investment quickly. Like the Newbie, they do not understand how cryptocurrencies work, and they don’t care. The difference between this kind of investor and the successful individual or professional investor is that the gambler does not care about the management of risk, or about the timing of trades.
They place their money on the table, and they hope it will make a good return. They are gambling rather than creating an investment thesis and executing a well-thought out strategy. They might even have an infectious positive attitude, but unfortunately it is not backed by knowledge or the due diligence required to be a successful investor.
A good example of this style of thinking, outside of cryptocurrency, is high yield investment plans (HYIPs) that promise to multiply an investors capital by a certain factor. This is not to say that all HYIP programs are scams, but a good number of them are. Most importantly, the investors who flock into such plans have similar characteristics to that of the Get Rich Quick investor in that they will not take the time to learn about the field in which they are investing. They are just looking for fast money and an overnight success. “ “Types of Investors §3
Short Term Traders (Day/Swing Traders)
Short term traders must, without a doubt, be the most knowledgeable investors if they are going to succeed at their chosen profession. They have, or they should have, studied the art and science of trading more thoroughly than other people. This is the kind of investor who has taken the time to learn about cryptocurrencies and the markets on which they trade. Short term traders create deliberate and timed strategies in an attempt to profit from fast market movements. Maybe many of the short term traders started off as Newbies, but these are the individuals who took the time and effort to learn about the market. They wanted to know what they were doing. These are the people who survived and thrived to grow into the type of trader that they want to be.
Interestingly, the Day Trader does not attach emotion to any given coin. They do not need to believe in the sustainability/whitepapevision/road map, etc. of the project they are buying into at any particular time. They just need to be confident about the direction and timing of the potential price movement of the coin. “ “Types of Investors §4
Long Term Investors/ Hodlers
A great majority of successful cryptocurrency investors can be most properly classified as Long Term Investors, or HODLers in true crypto terminology. These are investors who understand quite a bit about cryptocurrency and blockchain technology and believe in the sustainability of the coins in which they are investing.
Think of the first few investors who bought bitcoin in the early days and years, when it was still deep under the radar for most people. These are the people who believed in the blockchain and cryptocurrency revolution. They didn’t sell their bitcoin for fast profit, although they had many chances to do so. They knew what they were doing, holding for the long term. These early investors and HODLers enjoyed astronomical growth all the way up to 2016 and 2017. But to be a long-term holder despite all the bad news and negative factors surrounding this brand new asset class, they must have really believed that bitcoin and the blockchain were going to change the world. This belief can only be established through study and research about the blockchain industry and the specific currencies and tokens in which you are going to invest.
Follow up and learn more on www.ubai.co!” “Types of Investors §5
Sophisticated/Professional Investors
These are experts in cryptocurrency investing. They most likely have a background in other forms of trading and investing, such as in stocks, bonds or options etc. They may also be earning fees by investing or managing money for other people.
The Iconomi fund managers are a good example. Each Fund Manager manages an array of digital assets. Investors might choose Iconomi because it offers a platform for the investor to allocate funds to specific fund managers, with the ability to swap between managers instantly if the investor desires to do so.
Each fund manager selects a number of coins in which they wish to trade or invest, with specified time horizons, short or long term. Investors can buy into the array of mutually held coins. This allows investors to utilize the knowledge and experience of professional fund managers to trade an allocated pool of capital, hopefully generating returns greater than the individual investor would be able to produce on his own.
The fund managers are motivated by the fees and commissions they earn, and perhaps a performance-linked bonus. You can certainly be properly classified as a Sophisticated Investor without any need to be a fund manager for other peoples’ money. But a professional fund manager has the ability to trade with a larger pool of capital, manage complicated risk, and diversify trading strategy to generate various streams of income. “ “Between Countries
A particular country’s participation in cryptocurrencies largely has to do with the legal regulations about blockchain projects and crypto currency investment in that jurisdiction.
When China banned the use of cryptocurrency, most Chinese nationals had to withdraw their investments. Many other countries have also placed bans on the use or trade of cryptocurrencies. Countries like Japan that have allowed the use of cryptocurrencies have witnessed a significant rise in cryptocurrency investments as a result. Japan and South Korea are home to several high-traffic cryptocurrency exchanges, meaning that a notable proportion of their population is investing in cryptocurrencies.
Another way to look at cryptocurrency investment demographics is to look at the bitcoin ATMs present in each country. The United States of America is the leading country, followed by Canada and then the United Kingdom.
According to a report by Google trends, the five top countries interested in bitcoin are: South Africa, Slovenia, Nigeria, Colombia and Bolivia.
Remember, cryptocurrency demographics can be a little tricky due to the anonymity involved. Many people may be afraid to participate in surveys, especially when their governments have placed legal restrictions on cryptocurrency investing.
The main point the research seems to validate is that the demographics of the cryptocurrency investor base is diverse. While the average investor may be a white or Asian male between the ages of 26-30 with at least a university degree, the entire investor base is so much larger than that. Many big investors are likely to be significantly older, and have connections and businesses in the traditional economy as well. “ “Notable Investors in Cryptocurrency
While many people have made fortunes from cryptocurrency investing, a handful of them stand out as being particularly remarkable. We will take a more detailed look at some of the biggest investment success stories to see how they did it and learn about their investing strategy.
The Winklevoss Twins
After being awarded their settlement from the lawsuit against Facebook, the Winklevoss twins decided to invest a significant portion of their money in Bitcoin. They invested $11million of the $65million they received. At that time, the price of a single bitcoin was about $120.
This high-risk investment paid off handsomely and they became the first publicly known Bitcoin Billionaires, perhaps owning more than 1% of the total bitcoin in circulation. In an interview with Financial Times in 2016, the twins jointly said that they consider “Bitcoin as potentially the greatest social network because it is designed to transfer value over the internet”. They also pointed out that compared to gold, bitcoin has equal or greater foundational traits of scarcity and portability. “ “Notable Investors in Cryptocurrency §2
Michael Novogratz
A self-made billionaire ex-Goldman Sachs investment banker, Novogratz has invested more than 30% of his fortune in cryptocurrency. In 2015, he announced a $500million cryptocurrency hedge fund, including $150million of his own money. Novogratz believes that “the blockchain, the computer code that underpins all cryptocurrencies, will reshape finance, just as the internet reshaped communication”.
The investment thesis of Mr. Novogratz is similar to that of the Winklevoss twins. He has taken and maintains a long-term position while he trades in and out of short term moves, based on his fundamental belief in the potential and likely application of the underlying blockchain technology. By starting an investment fund in addition to his other cryptocurrency related ventures, he is demonstrating a strong fundamental grasp of the technology, including its applicability and impact across so many industries. Slide
Barry Silbert
In December 2014 after the US Marshal’s office seized 50,000 bitcoins from the Silk Road, Barry Silbert purchased just 2,000 of those bitcoins at $350 per coin. A few years later of course, those coins were worth millions of dollars.
Barry is the founder and CEO of the Digital Currency Group (DCG) a cryptocurrency investment firm. Barry also made significant profits from Ethereum Classic, purchasing the coin in its very first days. He has invested in over 75 bitcoin related companies, including CoinDesk. As founder of the Digital Currency Group, Barry endeavors to support bitcoin and blockchain companies and accelerate the development of the global financial system. “ “Directly through Exchanges
Step One: Register on a reputable cryptocurrency exchange
To start investing, you first need to register on a reputable cryptocurrency exchange where you can buy bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. Binance is a good exchange to use in this lesson. While it may or may not be the best, it is currently the largest, and they provide a very supportive layout and customer service department.
You should remember, to buy most altcoins (cryptocurrencies other than bitcoin), you specifically need to use an exchange like Coinbase or Kraken that allows you to convert fiat currency into cryptocurrency. From there, if you want to trade altcoins not listed on that exchange, you will have to transfer your BTC or ETH to a larger exchange like Binance, and buy the altcoin you want, using whichever trading pair that is best suited (BTC and ETH pairs are most common).
As we have already explained, if you are buying Bitcoin or any cryptocurrencies, you should invest in a wallet to safely store your coins. It is not advisable to store your BTC or other crypto on the exchanges for too long, due to hacking and other risks. “ “Directly through Exchanges
Step Two: Determine your Strategy
There are different ways to invest. You need to find a strategy that works for you and your specific set of skills. The value of a cryptocurrency is not defined by a formula or something out a textbook. If everyone was able to calculate the actual value of a share of stock, for example, or a bond, or other tradeable asset, then the price on an open market exchange would never move. Buyers and sellers would know exactly how much the asset is worth, so there would be no reason to sell lower or buy higher than the actual value.
You need to come up with your own ideas and strategies to take advantage of market moves. Sometimes you will have a position that is contrary to the general market. Other times you might be trading in agreement with a majority of other market participants. Investors are basically separable into one of two groups of thinkers. Contrarian investors go against the crowd, swimming against the current; Momentum investors ride the wave feeling secure in the majority. Being different can be good or it can be bad. You do not always want to necessarily get caught up in the most crowded trade. “ “Things to keep in Mind
Bitcoin Futures
We need to mention the bitcoin futures market as another potential way to invest. Toward the close of 2017, Bitcoin started trading on two fully recognized and well-established futures markets; the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE), and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange CME.
The key quote from the exchanges was “because the futures can be traded on regulated markets, it will attract investors, making the market liquid, stabilizing prices and it will not suffer from low transaction speeds of Bitcoin Exchanges.”
For a risk averse investor, this offers a safer entry into cryptocurrency investing. A futures contract commits its owner to buy or sell the underlying asset, BTC, at a set price, and at a set date in the future. The investor in the futures contract does not actually own the underlying asset, but rather is trading on fluctuations in the price of the asset over a certain timeframe, as specified in the futures contract. “ “Things to keep in Mind §2
Common Pitfalls We cannot conclude this lesson without one more look at the common pitfalls a new cryptocurrency investor should avoid.
The problem areas are: -Falling for scams by failing to carry out due diligence. -Relying solely upon self-acclaimed crypto gurus and experts. If you want to trade, you must understand how to read news and charts for yourself. -Too much Greed. Not taking profit when you should. It is better to take a 20% gain, than wait for a 100% gain, only to lose it all in the end. -Lacking an investment strategy or exit plan. -Not sticking to your investment plan or strategy. -Allowing emotions to rule your decisions. Chasing your losses. -Investing what you cannot afford to lose.
And finally, some time-tested wisdom from Wall Street: Bulls make money. Bears make money. Pigs get slaughtered every time. (Don’t be greedy!)
We cannot overemphasize the risk involved in cryptocurrency investing. The potential to make huge gains over a short period of time does not come without risk. There is no doubt that significant players in the global financial markets are entering the cryptocurrency markets too. We are likely to witness more and more government authorities trying to regulate cryptocurrencies, hopefully to the overall benefit of a healthy market. It seems safe to say we will see cryptocurrencies become more mainstream due to the intense interest from the traditional financial industry and institutional investing community all over the world. What are better ways to successfully invest in cryptocurrencies? Which pitfalls should you avoid? Learn all on successful ICOs and STOs after reading the full lesson: UBAI.co How to start your STO/ICO campaign in 2019? Contact me via Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn to know more about our education: Facebook LinkedIn Instagram
submitted by UBAI_UNIVERSITY to u/UBAI_UNIVERSITY [link] [comments]

Request to Roger Ver: Please remove 3xploit as a moderator of /r/btc. Anyone who upvotes this post is showing their agreement with this request.

Reposting this here because it was censored from /btc.
For those that are not aware due to the censorship going on here (yes, I thought this was a censorship-free sub too), 3xploit also known as Marshall Long has a long and scam filled history in Bitcoin. There is no reason he should be a moderator of this sub or be playing a lead role in Bitcoin Classic development.
To summarize:
Please also leave a comment and state whether you agree or disagree, please, so we can get a clear view what this sub-reddit wants.
3xploit being a moderator here as well as being part of the Classic development team is unacceptable.
submitted by jkgy to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

Focus on the vision for Bitcoin, not just its price.

Preamble
The purpose of this post is not to discourage enthusiasm over the recent appreciation of Bitcoin. Everyone here is excited, and rightly so. I’ve put this together because I think people are getting a bit caught up in price mania and losing sight of the bigger picture.
The ideas I’ve pulled together here are pretty condensed as it is, so unfortunately I have no TLDR. I don't claim to have a prophecy to share, or concrete answers to questions about where Bitcoin will go in the future -- nobody does. But that doesn't mean there's nothing to talk about.
I would suggest reading slowly and giving your imagination time to picture or "render" things. There is no other way to grasp Bitcoin.
Final preamble: I know there are people in this sub who are here just for the gains -- they freely admit it, and they laugh at how "true believers" will be left holding the bag when they sell. My hope is that those of you who feel this way will have an open mind. You might see things in a new light, who knows?
Here we go…
The Medium is the Message
In the 1960s, a Canadian professor named Marshall McLuhan became widely known for his thorough analysis of the evolution of communication technologies. His central precept was that communication technologies have dramatic effects on populations regardless of the content they carry at any particular moment. The radio, for example, allowed private microphones to broadcast to widely distributed speakers, which enabled the amplification of private viewpoints on a public scale. This had profound effects on society that played out regardless of what particular messages were carried over particular radio frequencies at particular times.
McLuhan’s famous aphorism, “The Medium is the Message,” is a distillation of this precept. In point form: 1) each new communication technology changes the environment into which it is introduced; and 2) the net effect of a technology over time is both far more interesting and harder to discern than the effect of any particular use of that technology or phase of its development. In other words, it is harder to see the forest for the trees, but seeing the forest is everything.
So: what effect will Bitcoin have on the world over the long run? What is the meaning of Bitcoin?
The Roman Model
To understand where we might be going, we have to first understand how we got to where we are. In the West, our societies are founded on the Classical traditions which were seeded in Ancient Greece and “scaled” so to speak in Ancient Rome. McLuhan had a lot to say about this from a technological point of view:
The development of writing on lightweight media such as papyrus and parchment enabled the externalization of knowledge. Thus, the oral traditions of Ancient Greece were subsumed and replaced by written traditions which were far less lossy and could be refined over time. Writing on lightweight media also enabled the centralized control of vast resources over large distances, which would have been impossible using engraved stone or oral communication. This was perfected by the Romans and thrown into overdrive by Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the printing press around 1450.
In its abstract form, the Roman model takes the form of bureaucracy – hierarchical organization -- and this model has underpinned the structuring of society in the West for the past two thousand years. Look up "org chart" on Google Images if you can't picture one. Our societies are comprised of org charts within org charts within org charts -- try the following searches on Google Images: military org chart, bank org chart, government org chart, university org chart. Everything in our society is centralized, bureaucratized, and nested within the context of the nation state which is run by a central bureaucracy called the government, itself divided into departments within departments, orgs within orgs.
This is not to say that humans didn't organize hierarchically before ancient Rome -- of course they did, as do apes, dogs, chickens, etc. However, in a social hierarchy such as a tribe, there is a scale limit (Dunbar's number, 150) because each member must know his place and his role as well as the places and roles of all other members. The hierarchy lives inside its members' minds and looks more like a swarm than an org chart. Bitcoin is, of course, this type of network, where each node has full knowledge of the state of the network and participates in it voluntarily.
Bureaucracy, on the other hand, is based on the writing down of roles (job descriptions) and makes people interchangeable. There is no limit to scale as long as you map everything out carefully (management). The lifeblood of bureaucracy is the transmission of written forms of information (paper-pushing) from the center to the periphery along defined, linear routes. Each node receives its orders, performs its specialized role, delegates if the role requires it, and then awaits new orders. Privilege and planning are concentrated near the center -- as is risk.
These structures are inherently fragile and collapsible. If you undermine a high-value node as happened in the collapse of Lehman Brothers, the whole edifice collapses. The entire global financial system barely withstood the collapse of a single American bank - it is that fragile.
Each nation's banking system is likewise a matrix of bureaucracies operating as a single, hierarchical supply chain whose product (the national currency) flows outward from a central node (the central bank) through successively less privileged nodes (investment and commercial banks) down to the level of branches and ATMs. At each level of the banking system, additional product is created and loaned out (credit/debt) using the productfrom the level above as a stake (fractional reserve lending). The banking systems are insulated from competition by governments through the decree that taxes must be paid in national currencies. And to keep the currencies moving, everyone is raised from birth to want more and then given the appearance of more through the creation of more by fiat, meaning by arbitrary decree, without any necessary connection to the creation of new wealth. This is inflation: the steady creation of new money to repay debt and keep the show going. It is a Ponzi scheme by design, and it relies the continued "buying-in" of young people in order to survive.
Each national currency has value and utility only by decree and only within that nation's cell in the global mosaic. To move value from one nation to the next requires snaking it through tenuous international pathways, paying entrenched gatekeepers, and exchanging one national currency for another. You have to be somebody to access the banking system. The more somebody you are, the more access you get. It is principally through control of economic access that strong nations bully weaker ones, rich people bully poorer ones. There is tremendous pent up tension in our world as a result. This is where we are.
The Center Cannot Hold
McLuhan predicted that the advent of the electronic age and the emergence of global communication networks would lead to the dissolution of these centralized, bureaucratic structures from the bottom up. He died before the spread of the Internet but described the end result with crystal clarity in his writings. His vision of an interconnected world, which he called the "Global Village," is here now. Every person has the ability to broadcast information to others in their networks over the Internet. If a transmission is perceived as having sufficient value, the receiving people pass it on, and so on. Above a certain threshold of significance, transmissions are repeated by all people to all other people: this is virality and there is nothing that institutions can do to harness or stop it. The Arab Spring for example brought down an array of national governments in a span of months.
Like a rising tide, global communication networks are bringing about an inevitable dissolution of the Roman model all around us: the music industry was upended by Napster; newspapers are being displaced by twitter and blogs; radio stations are being displaced by podcasts; broadcasters are being displaced by Netflix and YouTube; brick-and-mortar stores are being displaced by Amazon and eBay; AirBnb is gobbling up rental supply; traditional transportation services are being displaced by Uber; and now decentralized currencies are coming after centralized ones. Quoting W.B. Yates: “Things fall apart; the center cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world.”
It is important to realize that even though the post-Dot-Com networks like Facebook and eBay were more effective than their institutional predecessors, they are still quite fragile since they are centralized. They can be hacked, compromised, back-doored, subpoenaed, or otherwise shut down. In contrast, a truly decentralized network is perfectly flat and impossible to shut down. The music industry could kill Napster by going after Sean Parker, but it cannot touch BitTorrent. True decentralization, at scale, is one of the principal reasons why Bitcoin is secure: whatever it becomes, it cannot be stopped because there is no center to hold, and nothing to attack.
At this point, I think it makes sense to explain how Bitcoin works, and why it has value. If those questions can't be answered clearly, there's no basis for thinking Bitcoin will disrupt traditional banking. I do, however, think there are very good answers to those questions which I'll try to present below.
Bitcoin and Blockchain
Imagine you live in a pre-historic tribe of ten people. As a group, you need to find a way to keep track of who did what work, and in what quantity. In other words, you need an abstract “work unit” that can be traded for work and held for use in future exchanges. You could use shiny rocks or something else similarly rare, but people would still be able to cheat the system: why do actual work if you can simply go on a hunt in the forest and find new rocks?
One solution is to create a ledger or list that keeps track of how many rocks each person has. If the ledger is the authority on who has what, people would not be able to inflate their balances by introducing new rocks or other work units from outside the system. The problem is, everyone has to trust the keeper of the ledger. If only one entity maintains the ledger, they ultimately control how much money everyone has (banks).
Decentralization is the solution to this problem. You can write down ten copies of the ledger and distribute a copy to each person in the tribe. At the end of the day, everyone could cross-check the transactions that took place with everyone else and a consensus could be formed about who has what without appealing to a central authority.
Eventually, the people might realize that the rocks themselves are unnecessary, and that it is actually the ledger that is important. The rocks, like all currencies, are meant to track work. If a ledger is already doing that, the rocks themselves become extraneous. The actual units of currency are the work units on the ledger. And if everyone agrees to use the same ledger, its work units have value.
The blockchain is that ledger and Bitcoin is its work unit.
Proof of Work
In the illustration above we can see that the utility of a blockchain is that it enables distributed peers to prove to each other that they have done work, and to trade their work units freely without appealing to a trusted intermediary. The obvious next question is: what proof do we have that we can trust the Bitcoin blockchain?
Bitcoin mining is based on a Proof of Work consensus mechanism. To put this as simply as I can, each and every mining node on the network is competing against the rest of the network to generate a small piece of data that proves it has performed an enormous number of computer operations using a batch of new, valid transactions as an input. The amount of work that it takes to successfully mine Bitcoin is dictated by how much computer power has voluntarily joined the mining network - and this is adjusted dynamically as miners enter and leave the network. Each operation requires a tiny bit of electricity since a computer must perform it, so as the difficulty of the Proof of Work operation scales, so too does the cost of generating it.
As of writing, the Bitcoin network is collectively performing about 8,250,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second, and it takes an average of about ten minutes worth of this grind for a single node on the network to successfully produce an acceptable proof of work and add a block of transactions to the blockchain. The winning node is awarded new Bitcoin by including a transaction in its block that credits its own wallet -- now we understand mining.
So you want to be a Bitcoin miner? Let's say you have a powerful gaming computer that can perform about 100,000 Bitcoin computer operations per second (a realistic amount by the way). It would have roughly a 1 in 82.5 quintillion chance of mining a block if you were to enter it into the mining race today. If you had a stack of 1000 of these gaming computers your odds of mining a block would improve to roughly 1 in 82.5 quadrillion. A million of them? 1 in 82.5 billion. Etc. Miners use specialize hardware to perform the computer operations, but the point still stands: it takes a staggering amount of computer power and thus a staggering amount of electricity to "get a word in" on the Bitcoin blockchain.
But let's say you get lucky and are able to generate a proof of work. That proof of work will be tied inexorably to whatever batch of transactions you are trying to add to the blockchain since those transactions were part of the input of the computer operation. Your transactions must be valid or else the rest of the network would reject your work. You wouldn’t be able to double-spend, create Bitcoin by fiat, or spend from balances that you don’t have the keys for. The network would reject your block.
The larger and more distributed the mining network is, the more cost-prohibitive it is to compromise it. In other words: the more people you have checking the ledger from different nations and backgrounds, the harder it is to override the distributed, international consensus. And that is why the Bitcoin blockchain can be trusted. It is audited by the largest computer network ever assembled and requires that an attacker control at least 51% of the network on a sustained basis.
The Open Blockchain
As more and more people use a blockchain, its units (e.g. Bitcoin) become more valuable. As the price of the base unit increases, it becomes more profitable to mine them at the prevailing level of difficulty, so more miners join the network. As more miners join the network, the level of difficulty increases and thus the robustness and security of the network increases. As the robustness of the network increases, it becomes more secure against attackers, so more users and investors are drawn to it. And so the price of the base unit increases. Which draws in more miners. Etc.
The adoption of a blockchain, like the adoption of any currency, is a virtuous circle -- one that Bitcoin has been nurturing successfully for nine years without any existential catastrophes. Bitcoin's heartbeat, the mining of a new block every ten minutes, has not skipped a single beat in nine years. There has not been a successful double-spend in nine years. There has not been a single accounting error in nine years. No balance has been mysteriously wiped off the blockchain in nine years. This track record has been established despite the fact that the blockchain is not protected by a firewall, or an institution, or shielded in a vault. It is not buried underground, or protected by obfuscation. It is out there in the wild of cyberspace for all to see and attack, secured purely by Proof of Work and sheer scale.
Bitcoin itself is valuable because it is the only work unit that can be included in a block of this particular, special blockchain: the open, global, transnational, borderless, censorship-resistant, permissionless, leaderless, most well-known, longest-running, and most-well-capitalized blockchain (credit to andreasma for this and many other insights). Because work units on this blockchain are scarce (per the 21-million cap), having the ability to sign for transfers of Bitcoin on the blockchain is a form of real control over scarce resources.
This is the pivotal point: to the degree that people around the world adopt and learn to trust the Bitcoin blockchain, its work units will have value. And it is Bitcoin's openness in particular that makes it the prime candidate for filling this role. Any computer on the planet can join the mining swarm at any time, just as anyone can join the network as a user, at any time, from any location. Even the Bitcoin development community is open-source and open to new developers provided they can prove their merits.
This is what is meant by The Open Blockchain: the Bitcoin blockchain is accessible everywhere and is open to anyone. It is welcoming. It enables people from different cells in the global mosaic to transact point-to-point, without snaking value through complicated interbank networks, without paying entrenched gatekeepers and intermediaries, and without having to convert from one currency to the next. If a country experiences a currency crisis, Bitcoin is a very real option because it enables people to transfer value out of hot spots and convert it into other currencies. The international monetary system is no match for this technology. Private blockchains are no match either.
Bitcoin’s Monetary Policy
Bitcoin is commonly referred to as "digital gold" since it is designed to function like a precious metal. The creation of new units follows something like the extraction curve of a natural resource. The issuance of new coins was steep at first but will taper off over time through successive “halvings” of the reward that miners receive for creating new blocks. Eventually, the issuance of new coins will approach an asymptotic limit of 21 million coins.
At each "halving", the rate of inflation is effectively cut in half, though it decreases ever so slightly with each new block. The current rate of inflation is about 4%. At the next halving in 2020, the inflation rate will be about 2%. In 2024, 1%. Etc.
The world has never before had access to a truly deflationary asset. Even currencies considered deflationary such as the Japanese Yen are not truly deflationary: the government can print an infinite amount even though deflation in Japan has inertia. Gold is not deflationary: new gold is mined every year. Bitcoin will eventually become truly deflationary, meaning the supply of available Bitcoins will contract year over year consistently. How is this possible, if there is no provision to destroy coins in the protocol?
There is guaranteed to be a year sometime in the future where more coins are lost due to people losing their keys than new coins are created. It will happen. As the miner reward decreases, years like this will become more common. In the distant future, decades will go by where every year is deflationary, and eventually it will be practically impossible for the supply of Bitcoin to not decrease in a given year.
Here is Bitcoin’s golden proposition: because it the first truly deflationary asset, it does not require interest payments or a never-ending influx of greater fools in order to provide a “yield” over the very long run. In the distant future, Bitcoin will have a low but predictable intrinsic expected return approximating its rate of deflation, as long as it remains secure.
When you combine Bitcoin's monetary policy with its robustness through distributed Proof of Work on a planetary scale, you end up with the basis for a global reserve asset more effective than anything else humans have ever had a chance to work with, including gold. Gold is modestly inflationary, it cannot be transmitted over a network, and it must be centrally secured and accounted for. Bitcoin has already obsolesced gold as a reserve technology, let alone Ponzi currencies like the dollar - most just don't know it yet. As people come to really understand Bitcoin’s monetary policy, they will flock to it as a safe haven, especially in troubled economies. If we have another 2008, Bitcoin will be very much in play.
Bitcoin as Money
People argue that Bitcoin's deflationary policy, high fees, and volatility make it ineffective as a medium of exchange. If you can expect a Bitcoin to be more valuable next year, why spend it this year? If it costs $20 in fees to buy a $3 coffee, who will use or accept it? If its value can double in a day, who will set prices in terms of Bitcoin exclusively? The truth is, Bitcoin is not yet ready for mass adoption as a day to day currency or unit of account. Anyone who tells you otherwise is getting ahead of the technology -- but this is temporary.
Just as the early Internet could only handle the transfer of simple text-based content but eventually scaled to allow everyone to stream 4k at the same time, so too Bitcoin will scale. The Lightning Network shows promise in this regard. It will enable and incentivize users to stake their Bitcoin on a second layer where payments are negotiated in a trustless manner between parties, instantly, and merely settled periodically on the blockchain. But even with today’s block congestion and high fees, Bitcoin is already cheaper and more efficient for large transfers of value than the banking system, especially internationally. People transfer hundreds of millions of dollars on the blockchain, securely, today.
Regarding volatility, we are still in the very early phases of adoption. Something like 10-20 million people own Bitcoin worldwide. Because the supply of Bitcoin cannot inflate to accommodate increased adoption, prices will continue to escalate in logarithmic fits and starts as adoption ramps up exponentially. Look up "adoption curve" on Google. We are still in the very early phases of the ramp-up, but eventually the curve will taper off and approach something like stability. We do not know how this will play out or how long it will take, and there will be serious volatility along the way; but if Bitcoin scales into a robust transnational currency trading on thousands or tens of thousands of exchanges worldwide, it will likely become more stable than most national currencies if not all.
Regarding deflation: over time, we will likely see new innovative uses of Bitcoin as a reserve for credit creation. People are clearly willing to operate in systems that use reserve-based lending, and they can work wonderfully: look at what humans accomplished in the 20th century! It is conceivable that Bitcoin could be used as a reserve for distributed, trustless, bank-like networks that issue their own tokens. We may end up using a modestly-inflationary cryptocurrency for day-to-day transactions and investment. There’s no way to know what people will come up with, but they will come up with things. And that is why Bitcoin must stay laser-focused on its role as the de facto reserve currency in the crypto-economy.
A Vision Statement for Bitcoin
Tying everything together: over the course of thousands of years, we have built our societies around the use of hierarchical principles of organization. These structures centralize control and privilege, but also risk. They are fragile. Too big to fail.
The invention and proliferation of the Internet paved the way for the dissolution of these structures, and over the past twenty years we have seen countless examples of entrenched institutions being wiped out by flatter, more effective networks.
Now we are seeing the early evolution of global, distributed, cryptographic value storage and transfer networks which will slowly displace traditional banking systems by offering faster, cheaper, more reliable routes, with better systemic risk profiles, infinitely better security, no access controls, and no entrenched monopolistic privileges over money creation.
Bitcoin was the first mover in this space and remains the incumbent. It is a global, secure, consensus-based currency that was bootstrapped from the ground up by ordinary people volunteering to participate in its development, mining, and use. It has grown exponentially in size since its inception, to the point where it is now upheld by the largest dedicated computer network in the world. Because it is secured principally by its unmatched scale, it is therefore the most secure accounting system in the world, which in turn makes the entries in its ledger the most trustworthy on the planet. If you can sign for a Bitcoin in the network’s eyes, you own it -- and nobody can stop you from owning it or signing for it.
Bitcoin is here, now. It is in the air all around us, accessible over wifi and cellular networks around the globe -- anywhere the Internet touches. The next time you walk down the street, look at the people around you. As they move through the air, displacing it with their bodies, recognize that they are literally wading through the Bitcoin network -- they just don't know it yet.
Suggestions for New People
1) Focus first and foremost on the vision and take an interest in the technology. I have a friend who is talking about putting $20k into Bitcoin, yet only a few nights ago he didn't know that Bitcoin isn't a company, or that a block isn't a single transaction. I have another friend who owns a whole Bitcoin but has never initiated a transaction. A co-worker of mine just bought $100 worth of Bitcoin but doesn't know that a wallet is key management software.
2) Bitcoin is an experiment with no precedent. Nobody knows if it will survive, what it will evolve into, or how it will be used. Even with its long-running track record, nobody can say with prophetic certainty that it won't suffer a catastrophic failure of some kind, so put only as much money into Bitcoin as you can afford to lose. I would offer the following as a good rule of thumb: if you have a negative net worth (meaning your debts exceed your assets) be very cautious with Bitcoin, and at the very least do not increase your debt to buy Bitcoin. If you have a positive net worth, do not go negative to buy Bitcoin. Having said all this, do keep in mind that any currency can suffer a catastrophic failure, including the US Dollar. Remember 2008. Don’t fall for illusions of security. We are all sailing in little boats on a big sea. Diversify.
3) If you believe in Bitcoin, try not to obsess over the value of Bitcoin in fiat terms, as tempting as it is. Try to conceptualize its value on the basis of its potential utility in emerging decentralized networks and look for ways to use it in these new emerging ecosystems. Look up OpenBazaar for example - it could be the new eBay without an eBay acting as an intermediary. I strongly believe that owning Bitcoin is exciting because it sets you up to have a stake in this emerging ecosystem. If your aim is to eventually get your value out of Bitcoin in the form of fiat, you’ll be giving up that stake. If you don't care about having a stake and are here just for the gains, that's perfectly fine too.
4) Learn how to take possession of your private keys. If you don't know what that means or how to do it, learn what it means and how to do it. Until you can say with confidence "I alone own my private keys", you do not actually own Bitcoin and you do not have a stake. Someone else owns it for you. It took me two years of owning Bitcoin before I actually clued in and took control of my own, and that is what forced me to take on the Bitcoin learning curve. The good news is, you can too.
(Edit: formatting)
submitted by noah6624 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bowl Experience Project Day 14: The St. Petersburg and TaxSlayer Bowls!

Bowl Experience Project Day 14: The St. Petersburg and TaxSlayer Bowls!

stpetersburg St. Petersburg Bowl stpetersburg - Writeup by xelphin

2016 Matchup: miamioh Miami OH vs. Mississippi State Mississippi State

miamioh Miami (OH) (6-6) miamioh
Miami (OH) Redhawks - Miami made history this season after starting with a rocky 0-6 start to the season and ending with an unprecedented 6-0 finish of the season to bring them to .500 and ensure bowl eligibility. Some claim that the change is due in part a change in the depth chart, which put Gus Ragland in the driver's seat at QB. This may be the redshirt sophomore's chance to make the MAC shine.
Losing close to WKU and creeping up on Cincinnati are sour tastes in the Redhawks' mouths and this bowl game is surely one of the toughest of their season. The Redhawks run defense, which is one of the best in the MAC, will come into play for this game with Tony Reid, Heath Harding, and De'Andre Montgomery shutting it down any chance they get.
Mississippi State Mississippi State (5-7) Mississippi State
Mississippi State Bulldogs - The Bulldogs, entering the game 5-7 on the season, rode their Academic Progress Report into bowl eligibility and they are going to come out looking for blood in this bowl. For them, failure is not an option: Win, and the SEC beat a MAC team. Lose, and the SEC lost to a MAC team. Unfortunate, but true.
Because of this, Mississippi State needs to come out fired up, and that extra 15 practices may do just that. On the brighter side of things, Nick Fitzgerald is surely going to be looking for any chances to shine and could very well be a dominant force in the pocket. Look for them to show some of that 'SEC speed.' The defense also very much needs to step up, specifically on pass defense. If they can patch a few holes in the defense, they should have very few issues.
Bowl History
Location: St. Petersburg, FL
Stadium: Tropicana Field
Bowl Held Since: 2008
Conference Tie-Ins: American vs. ACC or Conference USA (Alternates MAC, Sun Belt)
Sponsor History:
magicJack (2008)
Beef O'Brady's (2009-2013)
BitPay (2014)
Payout: $500,000
Bowl History: The St. Petersburg Bowl is the third college bowl game to be played in the Tampa Bay area; both the long-defunct Cigar Bowl and the ongoing Outback Bowl have been held across the bay in Tampa. The bowl game features teams from the American Athletic Conference against either the Atlantic Coast Conference or Conference USA, unless one of the conferences does not have enough bowl eligible teams. In those cases, the Mid-American or Sun Belt Conference are eligible to send a team. This year, with teams from the SEC and MAC, they are slightly out of their typical fare as the SEC is not in their associated Conference Pool and the MAC is considered an 'Alternate'.
Interesting Facts:
Since Tropicana Field was originally designed for baseball, the football gridiron is arranged along the right field line, from home plate to the foul pole. The game is one of three bowls to take place in a baseball-only stadium among current post-season football contests; the others being the Miami Beach Bowl (played at Miami's Marlins Park) and the Pinstripe Bowl (played in The Bronx, New York at Yankee Stadium).
On June 18, 2014, it was announced that bitcoin payment service provider BitPay would become the new sponsor of the game under a two-year deal, renamed the Bitcoin St. Petersburg Bowl. Bitcoin, the digital currency, would be accepted for ticket and concession sales at the game as part of the sponsorship, and the sponsorship itself was also paid for using bitcoin. On April 2, 2015, after one year of sponsorship, BitPay declined to renew sponsorship of the game.
Notable Games:
2008 magicJack St. Petersburg Bowl: The inaugural St. Petersburg Bowl game was played on Dec 20, 2008, between the South Florida Bulls and Memphis Tigers, with the USF Bulls winning by a score of 41–14. USF Quarterback Matt Grothe was named Most Outstanding Player, after throwing for 236 yards and three touchdowns and rushing for 83 yards on 15 carries.
2011 Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl: The 2011 Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl featured the first Sun Belt conference team to play in the game, as Florida International lost 20–10 to Marshall (Conference USA). This was the first time that the Big East (a previous bowl tie-in conference) was unable to send a team to the game. FIU joined Marshall in C-USA in 2013, both competed in the conference's East Division for football.

Gator Bowl TaxSlayer Gator Bowl Gator Bowl - Writeup by remwin

2016 Matchup:kentucky Kentucky vs. Georgia Tech georgia tech

kentucky Kentucky (7-5) kentucky
Kentucky Wildcats: In both the last 2 seasons, Kentucky was one game away from being bowl eligible for the first time since 2010. After opening the 2016 campaign with a loss to Southern Mississippi and on the wrong end of a blow out against Florida, all the talk in Lexington was whether or not Mark Stoops would be fired. The Wildcats changed their offensive style though as Stoops took over on the defense, resulting in the Wildcats ripping off seven wins out of their last 10 games for their best regular season finish since 2009. It was also the most conference wins (4) since 2006 capping off the turnaround season with a huge victory over rival Louisville. Speaking of, Kentucky shocked the world as they topped the Louisville Cardinals by picking off Heisman winner Lamar Jackson repeatedly in a 41-38 upset.
georgia tech Georgia Tech (8-4) georgia tech
Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets: Georgia Tech may have had the quietest eight-win season in college football in 2016. They opened the season with a 17-14 against Boston College in Dublin, and equaled their 2015 win total of 3 after only the first 3 weeks. However, they dropped their next three games and entered the last half of the season at 3-3. As winners of five of their last six including wins over then #14 Virginia Tech and at rival Georgia, the Yellow Jackets showed marked improvement from 2015. Georgia Tech finished 10th in the country in rushing offense at 257 yards per game while seven players amassed 20 or more carries for the season.
Bowl History
Location: Jacksonville, FL
Stadium: Everbank Field
Bowl Held Since: 1946
Conference Tie-Ins: SEC vs. ACC or Big Ten
Former Names:
Gator Bowl (1946-85)
Mazda Gator Bowl (1986–91)
Outback Gator Bowl (1992–94)
Toyota Gator Bowl (1995–2007)
Konica Minolta Gator Bowl (2008–10)
Progressive Gator Bowl (2011)
TaxSlayer.com Gator Bowl (2012–2013)
Payout: $3,500,000+
TaxSlayer Bowl History: Operating continously since 1946 makes the TaxSlayer Bowl (Gator Bowl) the 6th oldest bowl game and was the first to be televised nationally. Florida and Clemson are tied with the most appearances with nine each. Starting in 2015, the bowl began a conference tie-in deal that will feature SEC teams playing ACC teams for three years, then Big Ten teams the other three years; Notre Dame is also eligible during ACC years.
Notable Games:
1978 Gator Bowl: Ohio State vs. Clemson - Ohio State coach Woody Hayes infamously lost his temper after a Clemson interception. Clemson player Charlie Bauman stepped out of bounds on the Ohio State sideline and Hayes hit Bauman with his forearm. Clemson won the game and Hayes was fired the next day.
1960 Gator Bowl: Florida vs. Baylor - Florida scored two touchdowns in the second quarter, but with a failed extra point, the Gators lead 13-0 entering the fourth quarter. Baylor RB Ronnie Bull punched it in from 3 yards out with less than 2 minutes to go to make the score 13-12. Baylor coach John Bridgers decided to go for the win and the 2 point conversion. Bobby Ply's two-point conversion toss into the end zone hit WR Ronnie Goodwin in the hands, but he dropped the ball and Florida held on for the win.

Now we want to hear from YOU!

Have you attended one of these bowls? If so, tell us about your experience! What was the gameday atmosphere? What advice would you give to fans traveling to the game? Do you recommend it?

submitted by CFB_Referee to CFB [link] [comments]

My first reddit post is my Bitcoin story

Long time listener, first time caller here..
It was around this time last year that I dove face first into bitcoin. I've heard the term in passing while watching YouTube videos on the inevitable collapse of the US dollar and the subsequent implementation of marshal law. Every time I would watch these oh so light hearted presentations, along with impending doom, I remember always having the same mixed feelings. I was constantly torn between a compulsion to combat the tyranny of the Federal Reserve's big banking system or surrender to the herd mentality, which most of us live by. What was a lowly peasant like myself to do? Well, after reading "the" white paper, and a few thousand videos later, I slowly began comprehend what bitcoin was all about. Finally, even though minute in scale, there was a way the average schmuck could finger the Fed, without actually ending up in prison.
So I started with coinbase(since it was a little cheaper than Mt.Gox), jumped through all the flaming hoops of verification, and started purchasing small amounts of Bitcoin. After that, I indulged my curiosity in cloud mining with CEX.io and even purchased some cryptostocks from the site of the same name. Albeit, these were some expensive lessons to learn. In hindsight, more research was in order, however the active participation morphed into a fix. I began reading as much as I could, studying charts, I even the I posted a few nooby questions and ideas on Bitcoin discussion forum. Most of my comments and questions were met with technocratic arrogance, which is fine. A couple things that new users should keep in mind:
1.Never let anyone discourage your search for knowledge and truth, because guess what, this technology is so new that anyone who acts like they know it all, are typically full of poo.
2.Ask questions, make suggestions, help each other out. The more people that get involved can only make this community stronger. Lets face it, this is not designed to be an elitist social club. More widespread adoption and understanding adds value to the network.
So much for keeping this short...but in closing I just want to touch upon what researching bitcoin has done for me and will hopefully happen for others. We are talking about, philosophy, mathematics, economics, cryptology, computer science, and that's just the surface. Once I got passed the frustration of not having a PhD in these fields and just soaked in as much as I could, at my own pace, I noticed that my mind started exploding with ideas and possible applications. For example, one of the first things I realized was that information could be time stamped in the blockchain. Being an advocate of free speech, this fact is monumental for me. Moreover, since the mainstream media is so controlled anymore, I believe that peer to peer connections are the way to truly stay informed these days and the next to come. Substantiated or not, I already get my news from my facebook feed and similar sites.
Furthermore, it's not just about the paradigm shift of power. I don't really like the term de-centralized. We are not simply moving away from something that is centered, and on to it's polar opposite. This is something totally new. I'm akin to words that sound more proactive and fresh, because this stuff really is so very new and fresh gentlemens. The fact that anyone in the universe can participate makes it more than just de-centralized. For me, it makes it universalized.
I hope someone likes my little story. I am obviously not the most academic or technical person, so there was some trepidation that led to hesitation on my part for posting anything on reddit. But I'm glad to be over that now and I aspire to share more. Maybe some folks will be encouraged to do the same. The more voices and ideas the better.
submitted by snakus44 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A few thoughts - Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Good afternoon. A few thoughts for lunch today:

/buttcoin controversy

Apparently, someone posted a link in /buttcoin to http://www.reddit.com/BitcoinThoughts/comments/296058/first_they_ignore_you_then_they_laugh_at_you_then/, which attracted 76 comments.
Reading through the comments, it strikes me that the people there don't seem to hate bitcoins. It would be odd enough if someone who hated a concept but wasn't affected by it (as opposed to, for example, political decisions that increased their taxes) wasted their days lambasting it on a forum. It seems to me that people in /buttcoin simply hate /bitcoin. I can agree with them on that one, although my reasons are lack of moderation, rather than making fun of people who post there.
_trp hits this one right on: "I don't like cosplay, but I don't spend all day on cosplay mocking adults for dressing up like power rangers, it isn't worth my or any rational persons time. They are people I have never met, so while I may mock it in passing, no drive exists in me to ridicule them day after day." However, his response doesn't go far enough. The correct response to /buttcoin is not to suggest that those people refrain from expressing their disdain; it's to suggest that their disdain is wrong in the first place.
If your actions have no effect on anyone else, then it is highly arrogant of me to claim that I am any better than you or that my beliefs are correct. What people who post in /buttcoin are missing is that their views are not any more correct than the views expressed in /bitcoin. By putting others down for their behavior that is self-contained to another community, they are making a statement that their way of life is superior to the other group. Unless we are talking about the other group actively seeking to cause harm, that is an ethically wrong belief.

Who is the winning bidder?

At this point, we have many losing bidders having been announced, but no winning bidder. There must be a reason why there is no winning bidder at present.
Some people subscribe to the conspiracy theory that the US Marshals Service has somehow lost all of their bitcoins. That seems like an odd argument for an agency that has, with one exception, appeared to execute the auction very well and obtained a high price for its assets.
A more compelling argument is that the winners may be people who have never before been interested in bitcoins, but who have unannounced plans that need to be funded. eBay would be an example of a corporation that might want to acquire a large number of bitcoins to jumpstart a new service.
People are saying that the reason that we don't know the winners is because the privileged information is the price. I believe the reason we don't know the winners is because the privileged information is who actually won. The winner might have no qualm about releasing the price, except that doing so would reveal who he or she is, which could create a competitive disadvantage.

An explanation for the stalling out (this time)

Last week, I stated that I was concerned because I predicted that people would find out what the bids were for the auction, and would raise the price in advance of the submissions. When that didn't happen, I said that there was something I didn't know.
Now that time has passed, my theory is that what I didn't know is that the banks still wanted to obtain the same number of bitcoins, but they couldn't buy any because if they won the auction, they would end up with too large a stake. Therefore, they waited until they found out whether they won or lost, and then those who lost returned to the market to complete their purchases.
It's too early to tell if the cycle resumes. If the bubble resumes rising until July 24, then this would be an example of how the auction itself wasn't really that important; all that matters to its results is the timing. The market simply found an excuse to adhere to the cycle. I'll talk more about that tomorrow.

Delayed bubble means suppressed demand; too long means no bubble

You'll notice that I never stopped counting down to the next bubble. Until the price breaks the lower boundary as defined by moral_agent, or a week or two after July 24 passes with no rise, the cycle is not broken.
Some people creating charts in /bitcoin make a great point that seems to agree with moral_agent's reasoning. The longer it takes until the next bubble starts to form, the higher the peak will be. Previously, moral_agent predicted that the high for the bubble would be around $3k. However, with this delay, some commenters posit that the bubble will peak at $6k. It would be within reason to say that the next bubble could be late by a few days without breaking the cycle. If so, then the high would be higher than a quicker cycle would cause.
This is common sense, as well. If the network continues to grow at a certain rate, and demand is held back for whatever reason, then the pent-up demand would be all released at the same time, driving prices up more than otherwise. I'm not going to talk about the news and the feedback loop and how all that feeds upon itself exponentially more with more pent-up demand, as you've seen that happen several times before.
On the other hand, I don't believe that a two-month delay to September 24 with a peak at $12k, as some suggest, is reasonable, as that has never happened before. Some people, like lowstrife, are trying to explain that the cycle is still valid, just significantly delayed. You can't extrapolate a pattern into a new set of circumstances that don't fit the pattern, and then suggest that according to the previous pattern we will simply have a larger bubble. This is what some of the expert "TA wizards" on CryptoCoinsNews attempt to do. If nothing has happened by September, the bubble cycle has long been broken and we need a new model other than the bubble cycle to explain what happened.

Finding good friends

If you aren't interested in anything other than bitcoins, then feel free to skip the following two sections. I'm going to go a bit off topic, and in the past some people have become angry with me for doing that. Fortunately, this isn't /bitcoinmarkets and I won't be derailing other contributors' threads.
I had an interesting thought experiment to post that I was exposed to a few days ago. A family member, who rents a house to a roommate, had an incident with the roommate. The roommate was climbing through the attic, when he stepped on the drywall and fell through the ceiling into the garage below. His fall was broken by an expensive piece of machinery, which caused $700 in losses.
When the family member asked him to pay for the damage, he replied "you can't prove it." That's significantly different from "I didn't do it" or "Yes, I did it, and I'll make good on it."
The family member, knowing him from a social circle, does not want to cause negative feelings amongst the friends by asserting herself against him to demand payment. We had a debate over this. She argued that it was worth losing the $700 in order to keep rumors and bad blood from costing her friendships.
I believe that this is a situation where one needs to reevaluate what "friendship" means. Someone who is unwilling to take responsibility for his actions is not a friend, so I personally would not care what he thinks of the situation. Not only that, but anyone who sided with the "friend" against me without finding out both sides of the story is also not a friend.
When you allow people to get away with things like this, you set a precedent that personal responsibility isn't important, and that is wrong. It will be interesting to see if there is anyone here who would actually suggest just throwing away the broken equipment and saving the "friendship."

Searching for miners

We're looking for a group of miners to provide us with data in preparation for our pool's launch. Only scrypt coins will be supported during the testing period, and the miners can have GPUs or ASICs. Testers will be able to play around with the unique features of the pool before anyone else.
The goal during this testing period, which would begin in 3 or so weeks and could last a month, is to prove a few things. We first need to determine if there is any interest in the pool in the first place, or if all the testers will leave before the end of the test period. We need to determine what fee we need to charge and ask testers what they would be willing to pay. We need to figure out if our algorithms accidentally destroy coins when more miners are added or take out all the buy orders for weak coins. We need to compute what our hardware requirements are, and whether we need more servers or can optimize code. Finally, we need to examine user actions and determine if users are misunderstanding features or finding them difficult to use.
If you are interested in being one of the testers, E-Mail [email protected] and ask to join. During the testing period, we will pay out 100% of everything we actually earn to the testers.
There are a few caveats. If there are display issues that show that you earned more than we actually made, then you will still be paid what your miners actually contributed. We will stand by our product once it is released, but during the testing period it is possible that we will not be able to pay out more than other multipools due to bugs or downtime. If we receive too many testers, or the testers have too many hashers, we could politely decline some offers so as not to risk miners losing money. Finally, while you will be paid eventually, payouts could be delayed during the testing period because you can't truly test the payout algorithm until there is money to pay out.
You'll be invited to a subreddit where you can offer comments and follow progress.
Note that we are only collecting names at this time and it will be a few weeks until we are ready to get started. Right now, we are delayed mainly by factors outside our control: a bug in Cryptsy's system that is costing us 4.5% more in fees than we should be paying, and waiting for parts to arrive through the mail.

Other

submitted by quintin3265 to BitcoinThoughts [link] [comments]

What to expect from the bitcoin price today?

The long awaited auction by US Marshals of 50,000 Silk Road bitcoins has finally been held, with the volume of bids reportedly well down on the previous auction of 30,000 coins in June. No word as yet on the price (which was kept confidential last time), but given what we know it seems highly likely the bitcoins were bought well below the current market price.
The BTC/USD opened below its daily moving average at 377 on the 4H Bitfinex chart and continued its (now rather tedious) sideways trend at an RSI of around 47. This indicated a near-term bearish presence in the market, a conclusion which was given further weight when a large seller on BitStamp dumped around 716 Bitcoins late in the day and pushed the price from 377 to 367, just below the lower Bollinger Band. This sale caused market volatility to quickly increase as evidenced by the increased gap between the pink and saffron lines in the chart above. Strong buying hands at around 367-370 brought the price back to just below the daily moving average, a point at which it sits at press time. Overall, this indicates near-term bearish sentiment.
What do we expect today?
A technical reading of the BTC/USD Bitfinex chart shows the price marginally below the 100-, 50- and 20-hour SMAs and EMAs, while the RSI is somewhere near 45. This indicates bearish bias in the market which has the potential to move the price south in next few hours. There is, however, a strong support level at around 365 which might act as an active barrier to help rebut any downtrend. If the price manages to break below the 365 support we see the next reversal sitting near the November bottom of 350 with downside risk towards 320. In the event that the price bounces off the 365 support, we see the next resistance level at around 390 with upside risk towards the 400-405 area.
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submitted by Kimba_Coinarch to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Chart Analysis / Talk June 25 - BTC USD The very Bullish LONG TERM Bitcoin Chart YOU WANT! ep. 51 ... BITCOIN DUCES TRADE LONG AND SHORT SET UP 1 MIN CHART ... Bitcoin Chart Analysis April 12 2018 - 2nd Wave Up Incoming? Bitcoin's Long Term Chart Could Change Everything

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Bitcoin Chart Analysis / Talk June 25 - BTC USD

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